Samsung pulls tablet computer from German fair

AP
FILE - In this Sepot. 2, 2011 file picture a  man walks in front of an advertising display for the Samsung Galaxy Tab at the Samsung booth at the IFA, one of the world's largest trade fairs for consumer electronics and electrical home appliances in Berlin, Germany. Visitors to Berlin's IFA electronics fair  on Monday Sept. 5, 2011 hoping to see the new Galaxy Tab 7.7 computer were disappointed after Samsung Electronics pulled the tablet amid a legal spat with Apple. The Galaxy 7.7 pulled its tablet from the fair after a Duesseldorf court issued an injunction against marketing the device, which Apple says copies its iPad.  A court is to decide Friday whether the Samsung tablet can be marketed in Germany.  (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File)
FILE - In this Sepot. 2, 2011 file picture a man walks in front of an advertising display for the Samsung Galaxy Tab at the Samsung booth at the IFA, one of the world's largest trade fairs for consumer electronics and electrical home appliances in Berlin, Germany. Visitors to Berlin's IFA electronics fair on Monday Sept. 5, 2011 hoping to see the new Galaxy Tab 7.7 computer were disappointed after Samsung Electronics pulled the tablet amid a legal spat with Apple. The Galaxy 7.7 pulled its tablet from the fair after a Duesseldorf court issued an injunction against marketing the device, which Apple says copies its iPad. A court is to decide Friday whether the Samsung tablet can be marketed in Germany. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File)

BERLIN (AP) — Visitors to Berlin's IFA electronics fair hoping to see the new Galaxy Tab 7.7 computer were left disappointed after Samsung Electronics pulled the tablet from show amid a legal spat with Apple.

The Galaxy 7.7 was pulled over the weekend after a Duesseldorf court issued a temporary injunction against marketing the device, which Apple says copies its iPad2.

The Duesseldorf court has already banned sales of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Germany. A final ruling on the latest model is expected Friday.

Consumers visiting the IFA on Monday said they regretted the removal, calling it "sad." Consumer electronics trader Carsten Niebuhr said he viewed the allegations of copyright violation as exaggerated, noting that "these products just can't be made any other way."