Russians briefly lose connection with spacecraft

The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-20 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off from the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Dec. 16, 2010. The Russian rocket carries U.S. astronaut Catherine Coleman,  Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratiev,  and Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-20 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off from the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Dec. 16, 2010. The Russian rocket carries U.S. astronaut Catherine Coleman, Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratiev, and Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli.

Russian space officials say they lost contact to the Soyuz spacecraft and the International Space Station for three hours.

A Russian news agency reported that the glitch in optic fiber network at the mission control center outside Moscow caused the disruption Thursday. A duty officer told the Interfax agency that the problem had been "completely solved."

The Soyuz TMN-20 with a U.S., Russian and Italian cosmonauts blasted off the Baikonur cosmodrome late Wednesday and will dock with the International Space Station early Friday.

The mission control center in the town of Korolyov outside Moscow was built in the late 1950s, and some of its equipment is badly outdated.