Roy Moore Slams America, Says 'Maybe Putin Is Right'

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Roy Moore, the Republican candidate from Alabama vying for the U.S. Senate, once slammed the United States for promoting “a lot of bad things,” and praised Russian President Vladimir Putin.

In an interview over the summer that’s getting renewed attention this week, The Guardian quoted President Ronald Reagan as once calling the Soviet Union “the focus of evil in the modern world.” Reagan made the comment during his “evil empire” speech in 1983.

During an interview last summer with The Guardian newspaper, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Roy Moore found similarities between himself and Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Photo: Jonathan Bachman via Getty Images)
During an interview last summer with The Guardian newspaper, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Roy Moore found similarities between himself and Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Photo: Jonathan Bachman via Getty Images)

You could say that very well about America, couldn’t you?” Moore said. “We promote a lot of bad things.”

Moore then cited same-sex marriage as an example.

When questioned about the fact that Putin held similar views, Moore gave an unconventional answer for an American politician.

“Well, then maybe Putin is right,” Moore said. “Maybe he’s more akin to me than I know.”

See the full interview above.

(h/t The Reagan Battalion)

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Ariel Olah of Detroit, left, and her fiancee Katie Boatman, are overcome by emotion outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 26, 2015, as the ruling on same-sex marriage was announced. The court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Ariel Olah of Detroit, left, and her fiancee Katie Boatman, are overcome by emotion outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 26, 2015, as the ruling on same-sex marriage was announced. The court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC.  The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Supporters of same-sex marriage celebrate outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Supporters of same-sex marriage celebrate outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The crowd celebrates outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The crowd celebrates outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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