Princess Charlotte's Backward Bonnet and Other New Parent Mistakes

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Princess Charlotte, daughter of Kate Middleton and Prince William, made her world debut wearing a backward bonnet. (Photo: Getty Images)

Princess Charlotte is already taking fashion risks.

When Kate Middleton and Prince William introduced the world to Princess Charlotte on the steps of St. Mary’s Hospital on Saturday, the moment was picture-perfect except for one thing: Charlotte’s bonnet was on backward. Ayajo Villar, owner of Irulea, the high-end Spanish children’s boutique that sold the handmade hat, confirmed to People: “Yes, she is wearing it backwards. The part that surrounds the face should be on the neck.” A minor wardrobe malfunction (to be fair, Middleton had given birth only hours prior) that could happen to any bleary-eyed parent.

STORY: Kate Middleton, Prince William Welcome Baby Girl!

The first week with a new baby is the most common time for parents — both new and seasoned — to make missteps, says Alicia Wilson, the “Baby Nurse Guru,” who is based in Brooklyn, New York. “New parents are often nervous and aren’t sure what to do and second-time parents can be overly confident because they assume what worked with their first baby will work with the second,” she tells Yahoo Parenting. “But all babies are different.” Here are some common mistakes parents make right away. 

STORY: Kate Middleton’s In Labor. Here’s What Happens Next.

Using a carseat incorrectly: When Prince William and Kate Middleton left the hospital with newborn Prince George in 2013, they caused a worldwide controversy after failing to properly secure the little prince in his carseat — a mistake made by an estimated 73 percent of parents, according to the organization Safe Kids Worldwide. George’s seat was reportedly forward-facing and the straps were too loose. Per guidelines issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), children must sit rear-facing until the age of 2 or until they’ve reached the height and weight limits of the seat’s manufacturer. And finally, the little prince was sitting swaddled, which can cause injury in the event of a crash.

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Kate Middleton and Prince William introduce us to Princess Charlotte on May 2, 2015. (Photo: Getty Images)

Inviting over many visitors: Naturally, friends and family want to meet your baby right away and you may be just as eager to show her off. But allowing your home to become free-for-all isn’t mentally or physically healthy, says Wilson. Exhaustion aside, many couples experience a psychological transition with the arrival of a baby (even if it’s not their first) and there’s an adjustment period for children who become older siblings. Taking time as a unit to adjust to a new life — whether that’s days, weeks, or months — is key. There are also health risks to consider: “A newborn’s immune system is so delicate and because they’re unvaccinated, they’re so prone to bacteria,” says Wilson. “Anyone who touches the baby should wash their hands first and no one should kiss a newborn on their face except for the parents.”

Swearing by a swaddle: Many babies love being swaddled because the cozy nature can be calming and promote a sounder sleep. But not all babies need or enjoy it. “Much depends on how big your baby is,” says Wilson. “A larger baby may not like being restricted and try to escape which could wake him up.” If your infant doesn’t dig a swaddle, many doctors recommend a wearable blanket or a “sleep sack” which keeps babies snug but not restricted.

Taking everyone’s advice but your own: “There are so many books telling you how much to feed a baby and when to put him on a schedule but babies aren’t books,” says Wilson. “It’s important to listen to your child and your own instincts.”

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