Which Political Reporters Are the Most Over-Caffeinated?

Dino Grandoni
The Atlantic Wire
Which Political Reporters Are the Most Over-Caffeinated?

How do reporters get through this never-ending primary season? Coffee and caffeinated drinks, of course. As his colleagues steel themselves for today's Super Tuesday coverage, Yahoo News' Dylan Stableford offers a fun piece with the the tongue-in-cheek headline, Campaign reporters and their crippling caffeine addiction, in which he presents a series of over-caffeinated humblebrags from coffee- and soda-loving reporters.

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Here's a brief look of several reporters' preferred fueling up methods. We'd suggest they take a moment to study caffeine's connection to heart disease, but judging from how much they drink, we're not sure they'd be able to focus on it very long:

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  • Carl Cameron, Fox News: 5 servings of caffeine, at least; "a large coffee with a shot of espresso followed by no fewer than three Red Bulls."
  • McKay Coppins, BuzzFeed: 5 Diet Cokes, "preferring that to Diet Pepsi, since Coke has more caffeine." He says: "I've resigned myself to the slow descent into obesity and caffeine addiction."
  • Chuck Todd, NBC News: 4-5 "grande size cups a day." He says: "It's close to having an actual coffee I.V."
  • Dylan Byers, Politico: 3 iced coffees.
  • Wolf Blitzer, CNN: 1 "Venti skim latte every morning"

Read the rest of Stableford's article here.