Police use water, batons to control India protest

India's main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party activists wear masks, from left, Indian Home Minister P. Chidambaram, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, Congress party President Sonia Gandhi, and Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit with fake currency notes in hands during a rally against growing corruption cases under the ruling United Progressive Alliance, in  New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011. Thousands of BJP supporters are marching in New Delhi to protest against the Congress party-led government's hosting of last year's Commonwealth Games. Auditors slammed India's preparations and conduct of the Commonwealth Games last year as deeply flawed, riddled with favoritism and vastly more expensive than planned in a final report that could result in criminal prosecutions. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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India's main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party activists wear masks, from left, Indian Home Minister P. Chidambaram, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, Congress party President Sonia Gandhi, and Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit with fake currency notes in hands during a rally against growing corruption cases under the ruling United Progressive Alliance, in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011. Thousands of BJP supporters are marching in New Delhi to protest against the Congress party-led government's hosting of last year's Commonwealth Games. Auditors slammed India's preparations and conduct of the Commonwealth Games last year as deeply flawed, riddled with favoritism and vastly more expensive than planned in a final report that could result in criminal prosecutions. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

NEW DELHI (AP) — Police are using bamboo batons and water canons to control thousands of angry protesters marching in New Delhi against a slew of corruption scandals plaguing the government.

The crowd outside the Parliament building Tuesday supports India's main opposition party. Angry scenes also took place inside Parliament as Bharatiya Janata Party lawmakers chanted against the government.

A recent audit slammed India's preparations of last year's Commonwealth Games as flawed, costly and riddled with favoritism.

The audit could result in criminal prosecutions and has added to the woes of the already scandal-plagued ruling Congress party. A former government minister has also been charged with fraud and forgery related to a 2008 sale of cellular licenses.