Pitchers: Lost in translation no more

BEN WALKER
Associated Press
FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2013 file photo, Chicago Cubs' Kyuji Fujikawa, center, of Japan, gets a fist bump from teammate Edwin Jackson, right, as interpreter Ryo Shinkawa looks on during a spring training baseball workout  in Mesa, Ariz. A new rule in Major League Baseball that lets interpreters join managers and coaches on the mound when pitchers aren't fluent in English might still need some tweaking. The rule has already been used in spring training. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2013 file photo, Chicago Cubs' Kyuji Fujikawa, center, of Japan, gets a fist bump from teammate Edwin Jackson, right, as interpreter Ryo Shinkawa looks on during a spring training baseball workout in Mesa, Ariz. A new rule in Major League Baseball that lets interpreters join managers and coaches on the mound when pitchers aren't fluent in English might still need some tweaking. The rule has already been used in spring training. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Major League Baseball has a new rule that allows interpreters to join managers and coaches on the mound when pitchers aren't fluent in English.

Even though it has already been used in spring training, the rule might still need some tweaking.

Asian players, like Yu Darvish, are routinely provided translators by their teams. But Latino players rarely receive the same benefit.

Most baseball teams don't have a full-time Latino translator. New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera is among the players who say a teammate or coach should be permitted to fill that role if needed.

Currently, only people who are employed full time by teams as interpreters are allowed on the field.