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FILE - In this Thursday, March 22, 2007 file photo two engineers works to assemble one of the layers of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)'s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particule accelerator, in Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists at CERN will hold a public seminar Tuesday Dec. 13, 2011 to present their latest findings from the search for an elusive sub-atomic particle known as the Higgs boson. Physicists are increasingly confident that they have narrowed down the place where it will be found and may even already have hints at its existence hidden away in reams of data. (AP Photo/KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini, File)

FILE - In this Thursday, March 22, 2007 file photo two engineers works to assemble one of the layers of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)'s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particule accelerator, in Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists at CERN will hold a public seminar Tuesday Dec. 13, 2011 to present their latest findings from the search for an elusive sub-atomic particle known as the Higgs boson. Physicists are increasingly confident that they have narrowed down the place where it will be found and may even already have hints at its existence hidden away in reams of data. (AP Photo/KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini, File)

'God particle' mystery confirmed

A newfound particle discovered at the world's largest atom smasher last year is, indeed, the Higgs boson,

the particle thought to give other matter its mass, scientists reported

today (March 14) at the annual Rencontres de Moriond conference in

Italy.