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Israel's Antiquities Authority archeologist Eli Shukron, below, stands in the Mikve area at the base of the Western Wall where an archaeological dig has uncovered ancient coins which may help date the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray, in Jerusalem's Old City, Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Newly found coins underneath the Western Wall are identified as stamped by a Roman proconsul 20-years after the death of Herod, a Jewish ruler who died in 4 B.C., and could change the accepted belief about the construction of one of the world's most sacred sites two millennia ago, Israeli archaeologists said Wednesday. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)

Israel's Antiquities Authority archeologist Eli Shukron, below, stands in the Mikve area at the base of the Western Wall where an archaeological dig has uncovered ancient coins which may help date the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray, in Jerusalem's Old City, Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011. Newly found coins underneath the Western Wall are identified as stamped by a Roman proconsul 20-years after the death of Herod, a Jewish ruler who died in 4 B.C., and could change the accepted belief about the construction of one of the world's most sacred sites two millennia ago, Israeli archaeologists said Wednesday. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)

Old coins shed light on Jerusalem's Western Wall

Israeli archaeologists have uncovered ancient coins near the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old City which challenge the assumption that all of the walls of the Second Temple were built by King Herod.