1 / 10

Khat

A woman and her daughter arrange branches of khat into small bundles in Mogadishu August 9, 2014. Grown on plantations in the highlands of Kenya and Ethiopia, tonnes of khat, or qat, dubbed "the flower of paradise" by its users, are flown daily into Mogadishu airport, to be distributed from there in convoys of lorries to markets across Somalia. Britain, whose large ethnic Somali community sustained a lucrative demand for the leaves, banned khat from July as an illegal drug. This prohibition jolted the khat market, creating a supply glut in Somalia and pushing down prices, to the delight of the many connoisseurs of its amphetamine-like high. Picture taken August 9, 2014. (REUTERS/Feisal Omar)

Khat - Somalia's paradise flower

Yahoo NewsAugust 26, 2014

Grown on plantations in the highlands of Kenya and Ethiopia, tons of khat, or qat, dubbed "the flower of paradise" by its users, are flown daily into Mogadishu airport, to be distributed from there in convoys of trucks to markets across Somalia. Britain, whose large ethnic Somali community sustained a lucrative demand for the leaves, banned khat from July as an illegal drug. This prohibition jolted the khat market, creating a supply glut in Somalia and pushing down prices, to the delight of the many connoisseurs of its amphetamine-like high. (Reuters)

Find more news related pictures in our photo galleries and follow us on Tumblr