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Homeowner Gary Gless sits on a hill in his neighborhood overlooking drilling wells in Los Angeles

Homeowner Gary Gless sits on a hill in his neighborhood overlooking drilling wells in Los Angeles, California December 11, 2013. The United States has a long history of keeping industrial activity out of middle and upper-middle-class residential neighborhoods. But that is starting to change with the spread of new technology for oil and gas drilling, such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking." Freeport-McMoRan, part of Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc, said that, for the past three years, its surveys of the oilfield and surrounding communities have found no connection between its activities and "localized claims of property damage." It said it would continue to evaluate the issue. Picture taken December 11, 2013. To match Analysis FRACKING-HOMEOWNERS/ REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENERGY BUSINESS REAL ESTATE)

Drilling boom leaves some homeowners in a big hole

Yahoo NewsDecember 12, 2013

When Gary Gless bought his sleek, modernist house in Los Angeles in 2002, he thought he had hit a "gold mine." The world's largest inner-city park - featuring a lush, 18-hole golf course - was about to get built across the street. Gless's balcony was set to overlook the clubhouse and first tee.

Today, instead of golf carts and fairways, Gless looks out on to drilling wells and oil pads. The park plan was ditched, and Freeport-McMoRan Oil & Gas LLC now operates 700 wells there - and 400 more are on the way. All the drilling, Gless says, has caused house foundations to crack and swimming pools to start to slide down hills. (Reuters)

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