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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2009 file photo, Libyan Abdel Baset al-Megrahi, the only man convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, is wheeled past a portrait of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi at the international hospital in Tripoli, Libya. The Dec. 21, 1988 explosion would quickly transform the Scottish town into a byword for international terror. Now it is being remembered again because of the 2011 conflict in Libya, the country that accepted responsibility for blowing up Pan Am Flight 103. (AP Photo/Abdel Magid Al Fergany, File)

FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2009 file photo, Libyan Abdel Baset al-Megrahi, the only man convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, is wheeled past a portrait of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi at the international hospital in Tripoli, Libya. The Dec. 21, 1988 explosion would quickly transform the Scottish town into a byword for international terror. Now it is being remembered again because of the 2011 conflict in Libya, the country that accepted responsibility for blowing up Pan Am Flight 103.

Lockerbie bomber in hospital

The former Libyan intelligence officer convicted of the 1988 Lockerbie bombing that killed 270 people was transferred to hospital on Apr. 13 after his health deteriorated quickly, his brother said.