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FILE - In this June 17, 2009 file photo, President Barack Obama is congratulated by Franklin E. Kameny, right, after delivering brief remarks and signing a Presidential Memorandum regarding federal benefits and non-discrimination during a ceremony in the Oval Office of the White in Washington. Frank Kameny was out and proud before people knew what being "gay" meant. Fired from his job as a government astronomer in 1957 for being gay, he refused to go away quietly. Instead, he got louder. He took his case to the Supreme Court in 1961 and helped stage the first gay rights march in front of the White House and Philadelphia's Independence Hall in 1965. Kameny died Tuesday at the age of 86, leaving behind a 50-year legacy as an advocate who chipped away at countless other barriers for gay people in America. Kameny served as the initial protester, leader and legal strategist of what would become a movement, one historian said. Applauding from left are, Vice President Joe Biden, Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., and Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)

FILE - In this June 17, 2009 file photo, President Barack Obama is congratulated by Franklin E. Kameny, right, after delivering brief remarks and signing a Presidential Memorandum regarding federal benefits and non-discrimination during a ceremony in the Oval Office of the White in Washington. Frank Kameny was out and proud before people knew what being "gay" meant. Fired from his job as a government astronomer in 1957 for being gay, he refused to go away quietly. Instead, he got louder. He took his case to the Supreme Court in 1961 and helped stage the first gay rights march in front of the White House and Philadelphia's Independence Hall in 1965. Kameny died Tuesday at the age of 86, leaving behind a 50-year legacy as an advocate who chipped away at countless other barriers for gay people in America. Kameny served as the initial protester, leader and legal strategist of what would become a movement, one historian said. Applauding from left are, Vice President Joe Biden, Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., and Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)

Rep. Barney Frank retiring

Barney Frank, the first openly gay serving member of Congress and powerful Democrat whose name is attached to a sweeping Wall Street reform bill, announced on Nov. 28 he does not plan to seek re-election.