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In this Friday, Sept. 20, 2013 photo, an image of a plane hangs on the wall as airport chaplains are reflected during a presentation at the International Association of Civil Aviation Chaplains' annual conference at Delta Air Lines' headquarters, in Atlanta. Airports are mini-cities with their own movie theaters, fire departments and shopping malls. Many also have chapels, which are staffed by a mix of 350 part- and full-time chaplains worldwide who are Catholic, Protestant and, to a lesser extent, Jewish, Muslim or Sikh. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Airport chaplains

Airports are mini-cities with their own movie theaters, fire departments and shopping malls. Many also have chapels, typically tiny non-denominational spaces, in out-of-the-way locations. They offer an escape from constant gate change and security announcements and are staffed by 350 part- and full-time chaplains worldwide - Roman Catholic, Protestant and, to a lesser extent, Jewish, Muslim or Sikh.



The positions are highly sought-after and considered glamorous, with chaplains saying they love the excitement and unpredictability of airports.



The job is unlike other church assignments. There isn't a permanent congregation. No baptisms, weddings or funerals. Instead, airport chaplains preach to a crowd that is transient by nature. (AP)