The nation's weather

WEATHER UNDERGROUND - For The Associated Press
The forecast for noon, Friday, Feb. 25, 2011 shows snow could fall at sea level in the San Francisco Bay Area, a once in a generation occurrence as a cold storm moves through the region.  In the East, heavy snow is possible inland while the coast gets heavy rain. (AP Photo/Weather Underground)
View photos
The forecast for noon, Friday, Feb. 25, 2011 shows snow could fall at sea level in the San Francisco Bay Area, a once in a generation occurrence as a cold storm moves through the region. In the East, heavy snow is possible inland while the coast gets heavy rain.

Active weather persists across the country Friday as two major weather systems continue pounding away at both the East and West Coasts.

A low pressure system moving down the West Coast will bring record breaking low temperatures to the state of California on Friday night and Saturday morning. As the system moves southward, it picks up ample moisture from the Pacific Ocean and produces widespread precipitation. Snow showers are likely to 1,000 feet across most of California, with sleet and frozen rain possible to sea level. Snow accumulation is not likely at sea level, due to warm ground temperatures. Winter weather advisories have been issued across the many hills of California, as snow may accumulate to as low as 400 feet. Expect snowfall totals across the Sierras of 6 to 12 inches, with 10 to 18 inches above 7,000 feet. Overnight low temperatures will range from the mid-20s to the lower 30s across the low levels of the West Coast, while the Cascades and Sierras will see overnight lows between -10 and zero degrees. Daytime highs will range in the 30s and 40s.

Meanwhile, in the East, a low pressure system continues making its way eastward, pushing a moist warm front toward the East Coast. While this system has already produced severe thunderstorms with hail and strong winds, more hail and tornado development is likely from the Gulf states to the Mid-Atlantic states. Rainfall totals will range from 1 to 2 inches in most areas, over 2 inches are likely in areas of severe storm development.

In between these two systems, a weak trough of low pressure leads a trough off the Rockies and into the High Plains. Due to cold air over the region, this will allow for light and widespread snow showers to develop over the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest.

Temperatures in the Lower 48 states Thursday ranged from a morning low of -20 degrees at Wolf Point, Mont., to a high of 93 degrees at McAllen, Texas.

___

Online:

Weather Underground: http://www.wunderground.com

National Weather Service: http://iwin.nws.noaa.gov

Intellicast: http://www.intellicast.com