National Hurricane Center watching 5 tropical waves in Atlantic, Caribbean

No news continues to be good news.

Florida is still suffering from sweltering heat, with excessive heat warnings and watches from the National Weather Service issued across the state and "feels like" heat indices of up to 115 possible in some areas. But the subtropical ridge dominating the area that's helping keep things hot is also keeping weather conditions "fairly tranquil," forecasters said.

The National Hurricane Center is watching five tropical waves in the Atlantic and Caribbean.

August is traditionally the beginning of the most active season for hurricanes in the Atlantic. Hurricane season lasts from June 1 through Nov. 30, with Sept. 10 the peak.

The most recent named storm was Hurricane Don, which dissipated nearly two weeks ago in the deep Atlantic. The next storms to be named would be Emily and Franklin.

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Excessive rainfall forecast

According to an update from Colorado State University last week, the primary threat formation area for major hurricanes in early- to mid-August is in the tropical Atlantic east of the Lesser Antilles. CSU's Tropical Weather and Climate Research Team is predicting 18 named storms this season, including the five we've already seen. Nine of them are expected to become hurricanes (including Don) and four are predicted to be major hurricanes.

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Two days previously AccuWeather forecasters updated their prediction of what's left for the 2023 Atlantic hurricane season and warned the Atlantic basin could get “very active” in the coming weeks.

AccuWeather is now forecasting 13 to 17 named storms this year, higher than the initial forecast of 11 to 15 storms released in March, with four to eight forecast to become hurricanes, and one to three predicted to become major hurricanes.

A major hurricane is a Category 3 storm or higher, with maximum sustained winds of at least 111 mph.

Here is the latest update from the NHC as of 2 p.m. Aug. 8:

What's out there and where are they?

  • Tropical wave 1: An eastern Atlantic tropical wave has its axis along 20W, south of 17N, and is stationary. Scattered moderate convection is noted from 07N to 10N and east of 20W.

  • Tropical wave 2: Another eastern Atlantic tropical wave has its axis along 35W, south of 17N, and is stationary. Scattered showers are noted in the vicinity of the tropical wave.

  • Tropical wave 3: A tropical wave approaching Barbados and the Lesser Antilles has its axis along 59W, south of 20N, moving westward at 10-15 kt. Scattered moderate convection is from the coast of Venezuela north to 14N between 60W and 64W. Scatterometer detected fresh trades at the surface near the wave axis.

  • Tropical wave 4: A central Caribbean tropical wave has its axis along 74W, south of 20N, moving westward at 10-15 kt. Scattered showers are noted in the Windward Passage near the northern terminus of the wave axis.

  • Tropical wave 5: A tropical wave previously in the W Caribbean has moved inland over Central America.

Who is likely to be impacted?

NOAA radar imagery of the Atlantic basin for 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2023.
NOAA radar imagery of the Atlantic basin for 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2023.

It's too early at this time to determine if there will be any impact to the U.S. from the tropical waves.

Forecasters urge all residents to continue monitoring the tropics and to always be prepared.

Weather watches and warnings issued in Florida

When is the Atlantic hurricane season?

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30.

When is the peak of hurricane season?

Hurricane season's ultimate peak is Sept. 10 but the season goes through Nov. 30. Credit: NOAA
Hurricane season's ultimate peak is Sept. 10 but the season goes through Nov. 30. Credit: NOAA

The peak of the season is Sept. 10, with the most activity happening between mid-August and mid-October, according to the Hurricane Center.

Tropical forecast over the next seven days

Excessive rainfall forecast

What's out there?

Systems currently being monitored by the National Hurricane Center.

What's next?

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This article originally appeared on The Daytona Beach News-Journal: Florida hurricane season slows to a crawl in early August