Marlins catcher Jacob Stallings struck out the Braves’ Ronald Acuna Jr. Wait, what?

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There wasn’t much left that the Miami Marlins could do in their blowout loss to the Atlanta Braves on Wednesday, and manager Skip Schumaker wanted to keep his bullpen as intact as possible with seven more games to play before a day off.

So out came catcher Jacob Stallings to pitch the ninth inning.

While it’s never a good moment for a team to have a position player pitch, Stallings at least experienced a moment he likely won’t forget.

For his final out of the inning, Stallings struck out Braves’ superstar Ronald Acuna looking, blowing an 84.9 mph four-seam fastball past him that landed in the bottom of the strike zone for his first career strikeout.

It was a moment of solace for the Marlins in an otherwise rough game. Miami lost 14-6, with the Braves hitting six home runs.

“Of all guys to punch out, one of the best players in the game,” said Schumaker, who himself had three strikeouts over four relief appearances across his 11-year MLB career. “That’s why he probably held onto the ball. It’s tough to laugh when you’re getting your butt kicked but there are still some human moments that are still cool to see. He’ll keep that ball forever, I’m sure, and have a picture next to it or something or have it signed. That is a cool moment. When you have a position player out there, that means you’re getting killed, right, so it’s not the ideal situation. It’s one of those Catch 22 things, right? A cool moment for Stallings, but overall, I don’t want to throw any position players. That’s a tough one.”

It was the second time Stallings pitched this season and third time overall in his MLB career. He also took the mound for the ninth inning of Miami’s 11-1 loss to the Minnesota Twins on April 3.

“I tried to have more fun with it this time,” Stallings said.

At that point in the game, what did he have to lose? The inning started with Kevin Pillar reaching on an infield single before Sam Hilliard grounded into a double play to bring Acuna, who earlier in the day was named the National League Player of the Month for April and had a three-run home run in the fifth inning, to the plate.

“I wasn’t super nervous for the first pitch” against Acuna, Stallings said. “I was nervous for 120 miles an hour back in my face. That’s what I was nervous for.”

Acuna took Stallings’ first two pitches — a 46.3 mph curveball for a strike and 44.5 mph curveball for a ball, respectively — before fouling off a 78.1 mph changeup to bring the count to 1-2.

And then, he watched as Stallings’ fastball landed in the strike zone for the strikeout. All Acuna could do was lift his head in the air and laugh, a sentiment that was shared by Stallings and players in both dugouts.

“I don’t like being in that situation,” Acuna said in Spanish between laughs. It gets me nervous because I never know what’s gonna happen. It’s easier to hit a 100 mph fastball. I saw that last pitch at 120 mph.”

Stallings is the seventh position player this season to record a strikeout on the mound, joining the Philadelphia Phillies’ Kody Clemens (Monday), Washington Nationals’ Lane Thomas (Saturday), Oakland Athletics’ Jace Peterson (April 22), Kansas City Royals’ Nate Eaton (April 10), San Francisco Giants’ Matt Beaty (April 6) and Chicago White Sox’s Hanser Alberto (April 3).

As for what Stallings plans to do with the baseball? An autograph might be in the works.

“I don’t really know Acuna like that. I don’t know. Maybe I’ll ask [Jorge] Soler if [Acuna] would sign it,” Stallings said.