Kyle Rittenhouse trial delayed until fall

·2 min read

The trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, the teenager accused of killing two people during protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, over the summer, has been delayed until November 1. The trial was originally set to begin March 29.

In a virtual court hearing on Wednesday, prosecutors and Rittenhouse's attorney agreed to delay the start of the trial to give them more time to prepare.

"There are a number of outstanding issues with discovery, DNA testing and some other issues that need to be taken care of. There are also some logistics with regards to the eventual jury that need to be hammered out," said Kenosha County Assistant District Attorney Thomas Binger.

"It will also give us time to make sure all the witnesses are going to be available and all the attorneys are going to available. Things like that," he added. 

Rittenhouse's attorney, Mark Richards, agreed to delay the trial and Rittenhouse stated he had no objection, even though the delay would push the beginning of the trial to more than a year after he was charged. Rittenhouse is currently out on bond. 

County Circuit Judge Bruce Schroeder agreed to push back the trial and set a final pre-trial hearing for May 17 to confirm the process is still on track for the November start date.  

Rittenhouse, 18, is accused of shooting and killing Joseph Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber with an AR-style rifle at an August 25 protest sparked by the police shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black man who was left paralyzed. Rittenhouse is also accused of wounding Gaige Grosskreutz.

Rittenhouse, who was 17 at the time of the shooting, is charged with two counts of first-degree homicide and one count of attempted homicide. He also faces charges of reckless endangerment and possessing a weapon while under the age of 18.   

Rittenhouse has pleaded not guilty to all charges.

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