Israel says Bahrain, Oman may follow UAE deal

An agreement to normalize relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates could lead to other Gulf nations recognizing the Jewish state.

Israel's intelligence minister on Sunday told Army Radio that Bahrain and Oman are "on the agenda," adding that there was a chance of a peace deal with Sudan.

Jerusalem and Abu Dhabi last week announced a U.S.-brokered deal for mutual recognition. In exchange, Israel would postpone a government plan to formally annex territory in the West Bank claimed by Palestinians.

But Palestinian officials and militant groups rejected the Israel-UAE accord.

Responding to news of the agreement, the head of the Palestine Liberation Organization, Saeb Erekat said it undermined Palestinian demands that Arab states recognize Israel only if it first withdraws from Palestinian territory.

"They want Arab recognition of Israel while they continue with the occupation, and the United Arab Emirates yesterday stamped the green light for this."

On Sunday, Palestinian militant groups in Gaza fired rockets at towns in southern Israel. Israel responded with airstrikes.

Senior White House adviser Jared Kushner, who helped secure the deal between Israel and the U-A-E dismissed these clashes, as regular flare-ups, adding that Israel saying Israel would deal with it accordingly.

UAE and Israeli foreign ministers held their first publicly-acknowledged call on Sunday.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hailed the deal as historic, and said he was still committed to extending his nation's sovereignty over the occupied West Bank.

Video Transcript

- An agreement to normalize relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates could lead to other Gulf nations recognizing the Jewish state. Israel's intelligence minister on Sunday told army radio that Bahrain and Oman are, quote, "on the agenda," adding that there was a chance of a peace deal with Sudan. Jerusalem and Abu Dhabi last week announced a US-brokered deal for mutual recognition. In exchange, Israel would postpone a government plan to formally annex territory in the West Bank claimed by Palestinians. But Palestinian officials and militant groups rejected the Israel-UAE accord.

SAEB EREKAT: The whole thing, the whole thing that we based our strategy on as Arabs is that the Arab Peace Initiative specified that once Israel withdraws, there will be peace between Arabs and Israelis.

- Responding to news of the agreement, the head of the Palestine liberation organization, Saeb Erakat, said it undermined Palestinian demands that Arab states recognize Israel only if it first withdraws from Palestinian territory.

SAEB EREKAT: They want Arab recognition of Israel while continuing with the occupation. And the United Arab Emirates yesterday stamped the green light for this.

- On Sunday, Palestinian militant groups in Gaza fired rockets at towns in southern Israel. Israel responded with airstrikes. Senior White House advisor, Jared Kushner, who helped secure the deal between Israel and the UAE dismissed these clashes as regular flareups, adding that Israel would deal with it accordingly. UAE and Israeli foreign ministers held their first publicly acknowledged call on Sunday.

BENJAMIN NETANYAHU: [SPEAKING HEBREW]

- Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, hailed the deal as historic and said he was still committed to extending his nation's sovereignty over the occupied West Bank.

BENJAMIN NETANYAHU: [SPEAKING HEBREW]