Iran says canceling sanctions 'helpful' to talks

Iran's chief negotiator Saeed Jalili, center, enters his car after a brief interview with Iranian Television in Geneva, Switzerland, Tuesday, Dec 7, 2010. Talks between Iran and six world powers are going into a second day with no sign of progress on U.N. Security Council demands that Tehran curbs its nuclear activities. (AP Photo/ Anja Niedringhaus)
View photos
Iran's chief negotiator Saeed Jalili, center, enters his car after a brief interview with Iranian Television in Geneva, Switzerland, Tuesday, Dec 7, 2010. Talks between Iran and six world powers are going into a second day with no sign of progress on U.N. Security Council demands that Tehran curbs its nuclear activities.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad says lifting sanctions imposed on Iran would help achieve progress in nuclear talks currently under way in Geneva.

State television quoted him on Tuesday saying "canceling the mistakes you made" would "definitely be helpful," referring to several rounds of U.N. sanctions.

Ahmadinejad spoke to a crowd in the Iranian city of Arak.

Iranian negotiators and representatives of the six world powers met in Geneva Tuesday for a second day of talks over U.N. Security Council demands that Tehran curb its nuclear activities.

The U.S. and its allies fear Iran is using its nuclear program as a cover for developing weapons, a charge Tehran denies.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

GENEVA (AP) — Talks between Iran and six world powers are going into a second day with no sign of progress on U.N. Security Council demands that Tehran curb its nuclear activities.

An official at the negotiations said the first meeting Monday gave little reason to presume that Iran would relent and address the demands. That would dash hopes of a renewed meeting in the new year.

Delegates from Iran, the U.S., Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany are meeting Tuesday at a conference center in Geneva.

Tehran insists its nuclear program is only designed to provide more power for its growing population. Yet as Iran builds up its capacity, neither Israel nor the U.S. are ruling out military action if Tehran fails to heed U.N. Security Council demands.