Investigators find gaps in White House phone records from Jan. 6: report

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Investigators from the House select committee probing the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol have found gaps in the White House phone records on the day of the insurrection, reports The New York Times.

Investigators were unable to find the logs of calls by former President Trump during hours on that day when they know he was sometimes on the phone.

There is no evidence that official logs were changed or deleted, the Times reports, and Trump often used his personal phone or those of aides for calls.

At least one call directed to Trump on the day of the Capitol riot was picked up by an aide.

Trump is known to have spoken to GOP Sens. Mike Lee (Utah) and Tommy Tuberville (Ala.), but the call was not present in the official records shared with the investigative committee, according to the Times.

The House select committee has been given access to various documents by the National Archives including presidential diaries, schedules, activity records and call records to Trump and former Vice President Mike Pence from the day of the insurrection.

Trump initially attempted to stop this move, but his efforts were overturned in a recent Supreme Court decision.

The investigators reportedly have yet to receive the personal call records of people including Eric Trump and Kimberly Guilfoyle, who is engaged to Donald Trump Jr., after subpoenaing their telecommunications companies.

The panel is also waiting to receive more records from the National Archives and Records Administration, which is in charge of official White House phone records.

Trump was watching the Capitol riot on cable news while it occurred, but the full extent of his activities is unknown.

A spokesman for the House select committee declined to comment on the findings.