Investigation into alleged cheating at high-stakes poker game could include lie-detector tests, casino says

Garrett Adelstein and Robbi Jade Lew.
Garrett Adelstein and Robbi Jade Lew.Photo by Hustler Casino Live
  • Polygraph could possibly be used in an independent investigation into an accusation of cheating in poker.

  • One of the most famous cash game players in the world, Garrett Adelstein, made an accusation Thursday.

  • He said he was "clearly cheated" when playing a hand at Hustler Casino against Robbi Jade Lew.

An independent investigation into an accusation of cheating in one of the most famous high-stakes poker games in the country could include lie-detector tests.

That's according to Hustler Casino Live (HCL), a popular live stream that takes place Monday to Friday in Gardena, California's Hustler Casino, and attracts some of the biggest characters in the Texas no-limit hold'em community.

Garrett Adelstein, a famous cash game player and a regular on the HCL stream, played a hand Thursday with a new competitor at the casino called Robbi Jade Lew.

Adelstein entered the hand with the seven and eight of clubs as his hole cards. Lew played wider with the jack of clubs and four of hearts.

After a flop of the ten of hearts, ten of clubs, and nine of clubs, Adelstein had an open-ended straight flush draw, a flush draw, and a straight draw.

A turn card of the three of hearts was ineffectual yet Lew, potentially aware Adelstein is a loose, creative, and aggressive player, min-raised his $10,000 bet to $20,000 to get to the river card.

However, Adelstein semi-bluff-shoved all-in to commit Lew's entire stack.

Lew then stunned the HCL commentator when she called his bet to grow the pot to $269,000.

They agreed to play the river twice but as both cards were ineffectual, Adelstein was left with eight high and knew he'd lost the pot.

Lew returned chips to Adelstein

The river ran twice.
The river ran twice.Photo by Hustler Casino Live

But when Lew turned over jack high with a four, he appeared puzzled at her call to his all-in, questioned her play, and later said in a statement on Twitter that he'd been "clearly cheated."

On the stream, Lew told Adelstein it looked like he wanted to "kill" her.

Off camera, and in a conversation with Adelstein and HCL producer Ryan Feldman, Lew gave Adelstein his chips back. However, due to contrasting statements, it is unclear if Lew voluntarily gave Adelstein them or if he asked for them.

In a statement Thursday, HCL said it had "no proof either way or any indication of any wrongdoing besides the accusations of parties involved," yet would conduct an investigation.

In a follow-up statement Saturday, HCL said part of that investigation could include the use of a polygraph.

HCL said it will 'release its findings publicly'

Hustler Casino in Gardena, California.
Hustler Casino in Gardena, California.Photo by Getty Images

It said it is in the process of "retaining experts" for its investigation despite being confident in its own security, technology, and integrity of its staff.

"We are in the process of hiring a law firm to conduct a comprehensive investigation, which will include staff and player interviews, a review of relevant records and possibly the use of polygraph testing."

HCL said its investigation may take time but once complete, it would "release the findings publicly."

HCL had previously said that, until the investigation had been completed, neither Adelstein nor Lew would be invited back onto the show.

On Twitter, Lew appeared confident that she'd be "vindicated" despite the allegations and even challenged Adelstein to a one-on-one match so "the whole world can watch me read you all day."

Adelstein, who Lew said had blocked her on the social media platform, responded Friday.

"Only right I accept her" challenge, he tweeted.

Read the original article on Insider