Incumbent, challengers formally enter Uganda poll

October 25, 2010
Uganda President Yoweri Museveni, left, being interviewed by a journalist in the capital city Kampala, Uganda,  after he was nominated to run for presidential elections that may extend his rule for over 30 years Monday, Oct. 25, 2010. Museveni is a flag bearer of National Resistance Movement the ruling party. He is being challenged by Forum for Democratic Change's Dr Kizza Besigye his former physician and long time rival, former UN under secretary general in charge of children affairs Olara Otunu representing Uganda Peoples Congress, Uganda's former local government minister in Museveni's government Jabeli Bidandi Ssali of Peoples Progressive Party and Democratic Party Norbert Mao among others. .(AP Photo/Stephen Wandera)
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Uganda President Yoweri Museveni, left, being interviewed by a journalist in the capital city Kampala, Uganda, after he was nominated to run for presidential elections that may extend his rule for over 30 years Monday, Oct. 25, 2010. Museveni is a flag bearer of National Resistance Movement the ruling party. He is being challenged by Forum for Democratic Change's Dr Kizza Besigye his former physician and long time rival, former UN under secretary general in charge of children affairs Olara Otunu representing Uganda Peoples Congress, Uganda's former local government minister in Museveni's government Jabeli Bidandi Ssali of Peoples Progressive Party and Democratic Party Norbert Mao among others. .

Uganda's president and three challengers have presented their nomination papers for the 2011 presidential poll.

President Yoweri Museveni and his main challenger, Kizza Besigye, brought their papers to the electoral commission at separate times Monday and later held rallies in the capital, Kampala.

Museveni has been in power for 24 years. He first seized power in 1986, then 10 years later won his first election.

At the time he was hailed for initiating a program of economic liberalization and openly dealing with the AIDS scourge in his country.

That perception changed when the parliament dominated by Museveni's party voted in 2005 to remove presidential term limits, enabling him to run again.