Hurricane Irma Sucked The Ocean Away From Florida And Bahamas Beaches

Hurricane Irma is so powerful that it has temporarily sucked the ocean away from beaches in Florida and the Bahamas in recent days.

Twitter user @Piznack, one of multiple people to share videos of the strange scene, tweeted on Saturday: “Y’all my family in the Bahamas said Irma sucked up all the water. There’s literally no water. The beach and ocean are gone.”

He sent out a follow-up video that showed how the water had retreated at a beach in Long Island, Bahamas.

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

On Sunday, the National Weather Service confirmed the phenomenon was also occurring in Naples, Florida. A public information coordinator for Clearwater, Florida, shared videos of the “negative surge” in Tampa Bay.

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

Angela Fritz, deputy weather editor of The Washington Post, confirmed this phenomenon is real and may occur during extremely powerful hurricanes such as Irma. The storm is so powerful that it can essentially change the shape of the ocean for a time, Fritz wrote.

“Basically, Hurricane Irma is so strong and its pressure is so low, it’s sucking water from its surroundings into the core of the storm,” Fritz wrote.

“In the center of the storm, where there is extreme low pressure, water is drawn upward. Low pressure is basically a sucking mechanism — it sucks the air into it, and when it’s really low, it can change the shape of the surface of the ocean. As the storm draws water toward the center, it gets pulled away from the surroundings.”

Wayne Neely, a forecaster with the Bahamas’ Department of Meteorology, warned residents of Long Island and Exuma, where water had also reportedly receded from the beaches, to be careful as the ocean surged back to high levels.

“Care must be taken in this case because the water often returns with even greater fury,” Neely said in a Facebook post explaining the phenomenon.

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

People who had seen the water recede in the Bahamas on Friday said the water returned the next day.

Irma ripped through the Caribbean Sea and parts of the Atlantic Ocean earlier this week and made landfall in Florida on Sunday morning. So far, the storm has killed at least 22 people and displaced thousands more.

Below are more images of the ocean disappearing, in some cases beyond the horizon, at beaches in Florida and the Bahamas.

Love HuffPost? Become a founding member of HuffPost Plus today.

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

Lydia O’Connor contributed reporting.

Also on HuffPost

Two men look for belongings in the rubbles of their restaurant in Orient Bay on Saint-Martin.
Two men look for belongings in the rubbles of their restaurant in Orient Bay on Saint-Martin.
A door is seen blown in at a Regions Bank in Miami, Florida.
A door is seen blown in at a Regions Bank in Miami, Florida.
A store window is broken in Miami, Florida. 
A store window is broken in Miami, Florida. 
A Cuban wades through a flooded street in Havana, on September 10, 2017. Deadly Hurricane Irma battered central Cuba on Saturday, knocking down power lines, uprooting trees and ripping the roofs off homes as it headed towards Florida. Authorities said they had evacuated more than a million people as a precaution, including about 4,000 in the capital.  / AFP PHOTO / YAMIL LAGE        (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)
A Cuban wades through a flooded street in Havana, on September 10, 2017. Deadly Hurricane Irma battered central Cuba on Saturday, knocking down power lines, uprooting trees and ripping the roofs off homes as it headed towards Florida. Authorities said they had evacuated more than a million people as a precaution, including about 4,000 in the capital. / AFP PHOTO / YAMIL LAGE (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)
A dolphin statue at Anglin's Fishing Pier lies toppled by Hurricane Irma.
A dolphin statue at Anglin's Fishing Pier lies toppled by Hurricane Irma.
A U.S. flag is tattered by winds produced by Hurricane Irma in Fort Lauderdale.
A U.S. flag is tattered by winds produced by Hurricane Irma in Fort Lauderdale.
A flooded street in Havana, Cuba. 
A flooded street in Havana, Cuba. 
Cubans wade through a flooded street in Havana.
Cubans wade through a flooded street in Havana.
A collapsed tree in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
A collapsed tree in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
High winds blow through Brickell Avenue.
High winds blow through Brickell Avenue.
Trees and branches in Miami are knocked down.
Trees and branches in Miami are knocked down.
Debris in the street in Miami.
Debris in the street in Miami.
A vehicle drives along Ocean Drive in South Beach.
A vehicle drives along Ocean Drive in South Beach.
Havana after Hurricane Irma.
Havana after Hurricane Irma.
A flooded street near the Malecon in Havana.
A flooded street near the Malecon in Havana.
Cubans wade through a flooded street in Havana.
Cubans wade through a flooded street in Havana.
A building in Caibarien, Cuba.
A building in Caibarien, Cuba.
Local residents return home in Villa Clara province, east of Havana.
Local residents return home in Villa Clara province, east of Havana.
Local residents at Villa Clara province, Cuba. 
Local residents at Villa Clara province, Cuba. 
Damage caused by Hurricane Irma in Cuba.
Damage caused by Hurricane Irma in Cuba.
Cubans wade through rubble in Havana.
Cubans wade through rubble in Havana.
A man looks on over the devastation of Hurricane Irma in Sint Maarten.
A man looks on over the devastation of Hurricane Irma in Sint Maarten.
A woman uses a can to take water out of her house in a flooded area after hurricane Irma in Fort Liberte, Haiti 
A woman uses a can to take water out of her house in a flooded area after hurricane Irma in Fort Liberte, Haiti 
Houses are seen on September 8, 2017 in Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda
Houses are seen on September 8, 2017 in Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda
Boys walk in a flooded area in Fort Liberte, Haiti
Boys walk in a flooded area in Fort Liberte, Haiti
Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda, devastated by Hurricane Irma
Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda, devastated by Hurricane Irma
A girl stands in a flooded area in Fort Liberte, Haiti 
A girl stands in a flooded area in Fort Liberte, Haiti 
A pup stands in flood waters in Fort Liberte, Haiti 
A pup stands in flood waters in Fort Liberte, Haiti 
Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda after Hurricane Irma
Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda after Hurricane Irma
A man uses a metal plate to remove water from his house in Fort Liberte, Haiti
A man uses a metal plate to remove water from his house in Fort Liberte, Haiti
Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda after Hurricane Irma
Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda after Hurricane Irma
People pass next to a flooded area in Fort Liberte, Haiti
People pass next to a flooded area in Fort Liberte, Haiti
A man wipes water in his house in Fort Liberte, Haiti 
A man wipes water in his house in Fort Liberte, Haiti 
Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda
Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda
Houses in Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda
Houses in Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting