Hong Kong's iconic giant floating restaurant capsizes in South China Sea

·1 min read

An iconic giant floating Hong Kong restaurant has capsized in the South China Sea,  less than one week after it was towed away from the city, its parent company said Monday.

Aberdeen Restaurant Enterprises Ltd. said  the Jumbo Floating Restaurant encountered “adverse conditions” as it was passing the Xisha Islands, also known as the Paracel Islands. According to a statement , water entered the 260-foot-long vessel and it began to tip Saturday.

The company said no one was injured, but that efforts to save the vessel failed. It eventually capsized on Sunday.

The company said it was “very saddened by this accident,” adding the water’s depth" made it difficult to save.

"The company is now getting further details of the accident from the towing company," the statement read. "Due to the impact of the current situation, Jumbo Kingdom will suspend its services," was posted on Aberdeen Restaurant Enterprises Ltd. webpage Monday.

An aerial photo shows Hong Kong's Jumbo Floating Restaurant, an iconic but aging tourist attraction designed like a Chinese imperial palace, being towed out of Aberdeen Harbour.
An aerial photo shows Hong Kong's Jumbo Floating Restaurant, an iconic but aging tourist attraction designed like a Chinese imperial palace, being towed out of Aberdeen Harbour.

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According to its homepage, Jumbo Kingdom is a unique combination of a scenic Hong Kong landmark, a renowned tourist attraction, and a fine-dining establishment.

The popular tourist attraction has welcomed celebrities and politicians, including Tom Cruise, Queen Elizabeth II, and more than 30 million other guests, according to the company.

Contributing: The Associated Press

Natalie Neysa Alund covers trending news for USA TODAY. Reach her at nalund@usatoday.com and follow her on Twitter @nataliealund.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Gigantic Hong Kong floating restaurant sinks in South China Sea