Heidi Cruz compares her husband’s failed presidential campaign to the fight against slavery

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Ted Cruz announces the suspension of his campaign as wife Heidi Cruz looks on in Indianapolis on May 3. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A week after Ted Cruz suspended his presidential campaign following a bitter loss in the Indiana Republican primary, Heidi Cruz is comparing her husband’s bid for the White House to America’s fight to end slavery.

“I don’t want you to feel like any of this was in vain,“ Heidi Cruz said during a conference call with the campaign’s National Prayer Team on Tuesday, according to the Texas Tribune. "I believe in the power of prayer. This doesn’t always happen on the timing of man, and God does not work in four-year segments.

"Be full of faith and so full of joy that this team was chosen to fight a long battle,” she continued. “Think that slavery — it took 25 years to defeat slavery. That is a lot longer than four years.”

The comparison raised more than a few eyebrows, particularly on Twitter.



“Aside from the absurd comparison,” Ben Carrington tweeted, “Heidi thinks ‘it took 25 years to defeat slavery’ So, U.S. slavery lasted 25 years?”



“#Protip,” Politico’s Blake Hounshell suggested. “Don’t compare your presidential campaign to the effort to end slavery.”

Heidi Cruz said that she agreed with the decision to suspend the campaign.

“I want to assure all of you that this was not a race we gave up,” she said. “This was a race that no longer had a viable path to victory, and it would’ve been very demoralizing for you all and the troops to go through nine states of losses. We left on a high note. We left when there was no possible way that we were going to win.”

But earlier Tuesday, the Texas senator appeared to leave the door open to the possibility of rejoining the race, however unlikely.

“My assumption is that that will not happen,” Cruz told conservative radio host Glenn Beck. “The reason we suspended the race last week is with Indiana’s loss I didn’t see a viable path to victory.”

But he added: “If that changes, we will certainly respond accordingly.”

Speaking outside his office in Washington, D.C., Cruz told reporters that the GOP primary should serve as “wake-up call” to lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

“All across this country people are hungry for change,” he said. “The frustration and volcanic anger with Washington was echoed throughout this election.”

But Cruz also said he isn’t ready to endorse the presumptive Republican nominee, Donald Trump.

“The Republican convention isn’t for another two and a half months; the election isn’t for another six months,” he told Beck. “I think we need to watch and see what the candidates say and do.”

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