Greece presents last tweaks to austerity program

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A member of an Athens municipal brass band plays as the Town Hall building is reflected in his instrument, during a demonstration by municipal employees on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. Several hundred people took part in the protest, against government plans to place 2,000 civil servants on notice ahead of reassignment or potential dismissal. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — A day before it hopes to secure release of a vital rescue loan payment, the Greek government has presented emergency legislation to tidy up the last loose ends in its austerity commitments to bailout creditors.

The two legislative acts published Monday must be approved by Parliament within 40 days.

They cover spending cuts and reforms, from increasing state spending accountability to reducing the pensions of Parliament employees — a pampered group of state employees that includes politicians' relatives.

On Tuesday, finance ministers from Greece's euro partners are expected to decide whether to release a €31.5 billion ($40.2 billion) loan installment.

Earlier this month, the government passed a new massive austerity program demanded to qualify for the loan.

Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras says Athens has now met all necessary requirements.