• Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Fox & Friends hosts say they're all vaccinated and it gave them a sense of 'relief'

·2 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Fox and Friends
All three "Fox & Friends" hosts say they've been vaccinated for COVID-19. YouTube
  • All three Fox & Friends hosts have been vaccinated for COVID-19.

  • On Monday, they agreed they agreed getting vaccinated provided a sense of "relief."

  • Host Steve Doocy said people who haven't gotten the shot are ultimately the the ones "in peril."

  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

As the hosts of Fox News' primetime opinion shows continue to push misinformation on the COVID-19 vaccine without revealing if they've gotten it, some of the network's morning hosts have taken a different tone.

All three hosts of "Fox & Friends" in recent days revealed they've been vaccinated.

Speaking about this on Monday, host Ainsley Earhardt said getting the vaccine provided her with a sense of relief.

"I will say there is so much freedom," Earhardt said. "I understand there are people that have vaccine residency but we all three are vaccinated and I tell you when I got it it was like OK..."

Chiming in, host Steve Doocy said, "A relief."

"Exactly," Earhardt replied, noting that it was now highly unlikely she would get COVID-19 and underscoring that the vaccine is extremely effective in preventing fatal cases of the virus.

Doocy added, "Right but it's the people who have not gotten the shot which, you know, ultimately they are the ones who are in peril."

Host Brian Kilmeade stressed that it was an individual choice to get the vaccine, but said Americans are "very fortunate" to have access to get the vaccines virtually anywhere in the country.

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

As Monday, 34% of the US was fully vaccinated, with more than 259 million doses administered, per a tracker from NPR. But despite widespread access to the vaccine and a growing body of evidence that it's safe and effective, polling has shown there's still a great deal of hesitancy about getting the shot among certain groups of Americans - particularly Republican voters.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting