With Egypt's Morsi, US faces a familiar dilemma

BRADLEY KLAPPER and JULIE PACE
November 27, 2012
FILE - This July 13, 2012 file photo shows Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi speaking to reporters at the Presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt. The US has been here before with Egypt, praising its leader for championing Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts while expressing deep concern over his commitment to democracy at home. But with options limited, the Obama administration is keeping its faith in President Mohammed Morsi.  (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)
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FILE - This July 13, 2012 file photo shows Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi speaking to reporters at the Presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt. The US has been here before with Egypt, praising its leader for championing Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts while expressing deep concern over his commitment to democracy at home. But with options limited, the Obama administration is keeping its faith in President Mohammed Morsi. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States has been this route before with Egypt. The US is praising Egypt's leader for championing Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts but is also expressing concern over his commitment to democracy at home.

With options limited, the Obama administration is keeping its faith in President Mohammed Morsi.

Within a week, Morsi has both emerged as a key U.S. partner in fostering Mideast peace and has used his new political capital to assume more power.

His actions are the latest reminder that Washington can't be sure where its relationship will stand with the Arab world's most populous country as it transitions from decades of secular autocracy. Morsi's rapid rise is forcing the U.S. to grapple with difficult questions posed by the Arab Spring.