Blinken says Netanyahu backs US proposal for ceasefire in Gaza

Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu (R) receives US Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Amos Ben-Gershom/GPO/dpa
Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu (R) receives US Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Amos Ben-Gershom/GPO/dpa
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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu supports the plan presented by the US for a ceasefire in the Gaza war, according to US Secretary of State Antony Blinken.

"I met with Prime Minister Netanyahu last night, and he reaffirmed his commitment to the proposal," Blinken told journalists in Tel Aviv on Tuesday.

When asked whether Netanyahu would pledge his continued commitment in the event that the Palestinian militant Hamas movement agreed to the plan, Blinken replied in the affirmative.

At the end of May, US President Joe Biden surprisingly presented a three-stage plan for a ceasefire in the Gaza war. The plan envisages the release of a certain group of Israeli hostages during the complete ceasefire. In return, Palestinians imprisoned in Israel would be released.

In the next phase, the fighting would then cease permanently and the remaining hostages would be released.

According to the draft, the reconstruction of the Gaza Strip would begin in a final phase.

Blinken also held talks with Defence Minister Yoav Gallant and other high-ranking Israeli government representatives. "And I think there is a strong consensus, again, behind moving forward with the proposal," he continued.

According to the US, only Hamas has not yet agreed to the plan. However, the Netanyahu government has not yet given its clear and public approval to the plan either.

The UN Security Council has now backed the plan. On Monday, it adopted a resolution to this effect.

Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu (R) meets with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Amos Ben-Gershom/GPO/dpa
Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu (R) meets with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Amos Ben-Gershom/GPO/dpa