AP Top News at 3:18 p.m. EDT

House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., at podium, declares that he was "disappointed" in President Obama's speech on a federal spending plan, Wednesday, April 13, 2011, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. From left are: House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., Ryan, Republican Conference Chairman Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va.   (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
View photos
House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., at podium, declares that he was "disappointed" in President Obama's speech on a federal spending plan, Wednesday, April 13, 2011, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. From left are: House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., Ryan, Republican Conference Chairman Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va.

On a bipartisan vote, the House Thursday passed a yearlong government funding measure cutting $38 billion from the budget and closing out sometimes quarrelsome negotiations between the Obama administration and Republicans dominating the House. The measure passed by a 260-167 vote in which 81 Democrats made up for defections from dozens of GOP conservatives, many elected with tea party backing. The Senate was poised to vote later Thursday and the president has said he'll sign it into law.

WASHINGTON (AP) — A spike in the cost of gasoline pushed wholesale prices higher in March, a trend that could limit consumer spending in the coming months. Still, most economists don't expect that will lead to widespread inflation because businesses are wary of raising prices when most people aren't getting significant pay increases.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — With everything Big Oil and the government have learned in the year since the Gulf of Mexico disaster, could it happen again? Absolutely, according to an Associated Press examination of the industry and interviews with experts on the perils of deep-sea drilling. The government has given the OK for oil exploration in treacherously deep waters to resume, saying it is confident such drilling can be done safely. The industry has given similar assurances. But there are still serious questions in some quarters about whether the lessons of the BP oil spill have been applied.

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel's attorney general announced Wednesday that he plans to indict the foreign minister on corruption charges but will allow him a standard final hearing before a charge sheet is issued. If Avigdor Lieberman is indicted, it would likely force him to resign, badly shaking the coalition government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, possibly forcing an election and putting already stalled Israel-Palestinian peace efforts off for many months.

TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi shelled a besieged western city Thursday, killing at least 13 people, and new NATO airstrikes shook Tripoli as the U.S. told a meeting the alliance must intensify its mission to isolate the Libyan leader and "bring about his departure." After the explosions in Tripoli, one resident of a western suburb of the capital said anti-aircraft guns returned fire, apparently at NATO warplanes.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The official who oversees the nation's air traffic system resigned Thursday and the Federal Aviation Administration began a "top to bottom" review of the entire system following disclosures of four instances of air traffic controllers sleeping on the job. FAA chief Randy Babbitt said in a statement that Hank Krakowski, the head of the agency's Air Traffic Organization, had submitted his resignation. He said David Grizzle, FAA's chief counsel, will temporarily take over for Krakowski while the agency searches for a replacement.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hispanics now outnumber African-Americans for the first time in most U.S. metropolitan areas, shifting the political and racial dynamics in cities once dominated by whites and blacks. Census figures released Thursday highlight the growing diversity of the nation's 366 metro areas, which were home to a record 83.7 percent share of the U.S. population. The numbers from the 2010 count are already having a big effect on redistricting in many states, where district boundary lines are being redrawn based on population size and racial makeup.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Thursday threw out a ruling that the National Day of Prayer is unconstitutional and ordered that a lawsuit challenging President Barack Obama's right to proclaim the day be dismissed. A three-judge panel of the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the Madison, Wis.-based Freedom From Religion Foundation did not have standing to sue because while they disagree with the president's proclamation, it has not caused them any harm.

NEW YORK (AP) — Shane Victorino charges hard from center field, chasing a sinking line drive. His glove, the ball and the grass all smack together at the same time. What's the call? Next year, it well could be: Let's look at the replay! Major League Baseball is leaning toward expanding replay for the 2012 season to include trapped balls and fair-or-foul rulings down the lines, a person familiar with the talks tells The Associated Press.

LONDON (AP) — Scuffles between protesters and security guards marred BP's first annual shareholder meeting since the Gulf oil spill, with shrimpers blocked from entering Thursday's meeting to demand more compensation. The protesters included five Gulf Coast residents who had planned to tell investors about the loss of their livelihoods and health problems after the spill. Outside the building, separate groups demonstrated over BP's polluting tar sands project in Canada and labor disputes in Britain.