Some airlines put Japan expansion on hold

Passengers wait for their flights at a check-in area at Narita airport, near Tokyo, Thursday, March 17, 2011. The airport was crowded with evacuees and regular passengers Thursday following advisories from foreign governments recommending citizens leave the country, as the crisis at Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in the northeast deepened. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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Passengers wait for their flights at a check-in area at Narita airport, near Tokyo, Thursday, March 17, 2011. The airport was crowded with evacuees and regular passengers Thursday following advisories from foreign governments recommending citizens leave the country, as the crisis at Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in the northeast deepened.

Even as airlines added extra flights to get people out of Tokyo, their long-term plans for expansion have been thrown into doubt.

Delta Air Lines Inc. says it will suspend its new flights to Tokyo's Haneda airport beginning next week. Singapore Airlines had planned to put the Airbus A380 on a flight from Singapore to Tokyo to Los Angeles later this month. But that flight will continue to be served by a Boeing 747 until further notice.

United Continental Holdings Inc., the biggest U.S. carrier to Asia, isn't cutting flights but is monitoring the situation. Both United and Delta use Tokyo's Narita airport as a hub for flights further into Asia.

Many airlines are adding flights as people heed warnings from foreign governments to leave quake-stricken Japan.