These 9 candidates have joined the House speaker race after Jim Jordan dropped out

House Republican Conference Chair Elise Stefanik said Sunday that nine candidates have joined the race for speaker after Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, dropped his bid last week.

Stefanik, R-N.Y., noted on X that the deadline to announce speaker bids was noon ET Sunday.

The GOP candidate forum is set for 6:30 p.m. ET Monday. Then, an internal conference vote will occur 9 a.m. Tuesday. Speaker Pro Tem Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., has said his intention is to move to a floor vote “as soon as Tuesday.”

After his defeat on the House floor for a third time last week, Jordan’s speakership bid fell apart Friday after he lost a vote of confidence at a closed-door meeting of Republicans.

The internal, secret-ballot vote was 86 Republicans for Jordan and 112 saying they wanted to move on from him and go with someone else, lawmakers said as they left the meeting.

These are the candidates who have thrown their hats in the ring after Jordan dropped out:

Majority Whip Tom Emmer of Minnesota

House Majority Whip Rep. Tom Emmer, R-Minn., ahead of the third vote for Rep. Jim Jordan's speakership bid. (Drew Angerer / Getty Images)
House Majority Whip Rep. Tom Emmer, R-Minn., ahead of the third vote for Rep. Jim Jordan's speakership bid. (Drew Angerer / Getty Images)

Emmer, the No. 3 Republican in leadership, officially announced his bid Saturday, a day after he began making calls. He quickly picked up an endorsement from ousted Speaker Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif.

“If given the opportunity to be your Speaker, we will use that same culture of teamwork, communication, and respect to build on the moments that brought us success, learn from our mistakes, and keep fighting for each and every one of you and our Republican majority,” Emmer wrote in a letter to colleagues.

Emmer, who previously was that chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee, also vowed to “always be honest and direct with all of you, even if we disagree.”

GOP Conference Vice Chair Mike Johnson of Louisiana

Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La., at the Capitol. (Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images file)
Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La., at the Capitol. (Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images file)

Johnson also started making calls Friday before he announced his speakership bid Saturday.

“We all agree the urgency of this hour demands a specific plan and bold, decisive action. It also demands a leader who will humble himself each day before Almighty God, selflessly serve the full membership of this body, and fight ceaselessly for our core conservative principles and policies,” Johnson said in a letter to colleagues.

Johnson, an attorney and former talk show host, is serving his fourth term and sits on the Judiciary Committee. He previously supported Jordan’s speakership bid.

Jack Bergman of Michigan

Rep. Jack Bergman. (Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images)
Rep. Jack Bergman. (Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images)

Bergman, a retired Marine lieutenant general who is in his fourth term, announced his speakership bid Friday.

“The regular functioning of the federal government can’t wait on useless infighting and arguments,” Bergman said in a statement. “What matters right now is choosing a Speaker in order to make sure that our government — and particularly our military — is funded, and that both our homeland and our critical allies are secure in this time of crisis.”

James Hogge, his communications director, said Bergman had “proudly supported” Jordan’s speakership bid but was “approached by colleagues and has had conversations about a possible Speaker run” following the second round of voting.

Byron Donalds of Florida

Rep. Byron Donalds, R-Fla., at the Capitol. (Drew Angerer / Getty Images file)
Rep. Byron Donalds, R-Fla., at the Capitol. (Drew Angerer / Getty Images file)

Donalds, a second-term lawmaker, is on the Financial Services and Oversight committees. He announced his speakership bid Friday.

“My sole focus will be securing our border, funding our government responsibly, advancing a conservative vision for the House of Representatives and the American people, and expanding our Republican majority,” he said in his announcement.

Donalds, who makes frequent appearances on right-wing media, was nominated for speaker by his conservative Freedom Caucus colleagues in January.

Kevin Hern of Oklahoma

Rep. Kevin Hern. (Win McNamee / Getty Images file)
Rep. Kevin Hern. (Win McNamee / Getty Images file)

Hern, chairman of the Republican Study Committee, the largest caucus of conservatives on Capitol Hill, launched a bid Friday.

“I’m in,” Hern told NBC News as he left a closed-door meeting of Republicans on Friday. Hern had voted in support of Jordan’s speaker bid.

“We must unify and do it fast,” Hern said in a statement announcing his own bid. “I’ve spoken to every member of the conference over the last few weeks.

“We need a different type of leader who has a proven track record of success, which is why I’m running for Speaker of the House,” he added.

Dan Meuser of Pennsylvania

Rep. Dan Meuser. (Mariam Zuhaib / AP file)
Rep. Dan Meuser. (Mariam Zuhaib / AP file)

Meuser, a former business executive, signaled his consideration of a bid after Jordan dropped out.

“I come from the business world, and I plan to bring, if I run, a business perspective to things and gain consensus,” Meuser said Friday.

Meuser, who entered Congress in 2019, is on the Financial Services and Small Business committees. He previously was secretary of revenue in Pennsylvania.

Gary Palmer of Alabama

Rep. Gary Palmer. (Bill Clark / CQ-Roll Call via AP file)
Rep. Gary Palmer. (Bill Clark / CQ-Roll Call via AP file)

Palmer, a fifth-term congressman who was elected in 2014, has been the chair of the Republican Policy Committee since 2019.

He serves on the House Oversight and Accountability Committee and the Energy and Commerce Committee. Before his time in Congress, he co-founded the Alabama Policy Institute, a conservative think tank.

Austin Scott of Georgia

Rep. Austin Scott. (Bryan Olin Dozier / AP file)
Rep. Austin Scott. (Bryan Olin Dozier / AP file)

Scott, who had challenged Jordan for speaker, signaled he’ll run again after Jordan dropped his bid.

“If we are going to be the majority we need to act like the majority, and that means we have to do the right things the right way,” Scott wrote on X. “I supported and voted for Rep. Jim Jordan to be the Speaker of the House. Now that he has withdrawn I am running again to be the Speaker of the House.

Scott previously lost the secret-ballot vote against Jordan 124-81.

Pete Sessions of Texas

Rep. Pete Sessions. (Bill Clark / CQ-Roll Call via AP file)
Rep. Pete Sessions. (Bill Clark / CQ-Roll Call via AP file)

Sessions, a former Rules Committee chairman, announced his bid Friday.

“Congressman Sessions believes he can forge a positive path as a conservative leader who can unite the Conference,” his office wrote in a statement.

Sessions also was chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee.

This article was originally published on NBCNews.com