New York Fashion Week breaks out designs for all seasons

By Patricia Reaney

By Patricia Reaney

NEW YORK (Reuters) - More designers at New York Fashion Week broke out of the industry's long-established mode of showing clothes meant to be worn in six months' time by sprinkling wear-now fall looks among catwalk presentations largely focused on next spring.

"Instant gratification, that is the mantra of a whole generation of people, and when they see it they want it, and we are going into the fall season so it makes a lot of sense," said Roseanne Morrison, fashion director at trends forecaster The Doneger Group.

Deconstructed shirts with ruffles, off-the-shoulder or asymmetrical, were a favorite on the runway, along with layering, bold stripes, checkerboard patterns and floral prints.

Bright yellow, Kelly green, cobalt and hot pink were in vogue, along with exaggerated pant legs, bell sleeves, jumpsuits and slouchy silhouettes.

Marc Jacobs' spring-focused show at the Hammerstein Ballroom on Thursday was all glitter and glam as dreadlocked models strutted in mini dresses, embellished satin shorts and platform shoes.

In an enclosed area outside his Madison Avenue store, Ralph Lauren showcased a buy-now fall collection that included embroidered Native American-inspired motif jackets, cowboy hats and sparkling gowns.

Shows at the semiannual event have steadily become more elaborate as designers seek unusual settings to get the most attention for their collections.

"It gives designers an opportunity to break through the noise and to showcase their products in unique ways," said April Uchitel, chief brand officer at online marketplace Spring.

Tom Ford returned to New York Fashion week with a celebrity-packed show for fall at the recently closed Four Seasons Restaurant, where guests were served dinner. He paired belted jackets and leopard-print and multicolor fur coats with leather and tweed skirts.

Tommy Hilfiger transformed a pier at Manhattan's South Street Seaport into a carnival to launch his nautical-inspired, buy-now TommyXGigi collaboration with model Gigi Hadid.

Carolina Herrera chose The Frick Collection museum on Manhattan's Upper East Side to introduce spring looks that included strapless gowns in denim, gingham, tulle, lace and brocade.

Design duo Badgley Mischka eschewed the runway entirely for their first collection since taking back ownership of their brand from Iconix Brand Group. They showed their clothes in a movie titled "Storm," in which platinum-haired models paraded in a surreal Arctic landscape.

"It's not just about the clothes," said Kyle Anderson, market and accessories director at Marie Claire magazine. "There are a lot of other aspects that people have to consider and make sure they are among what everyone is doing now in the industry."

(Reporting by Patricia Reaney; Editing by Scott Malone and Richard Chang)