Tommy Stinson Reunites Post-Replacements Band Bash and Pop

Rolling Stone
Tommy Stinson Reunites Post-Replacements Band Bash and Pop
Tommy Stinson has relaunched Bash and Pop and will put out a new album 'Anything Could Happen' early next year.

Tommy Stinson has reassembled his band Bash and Pop, which he played in between stints in the Replacements and Guns N' Roses in the early Nineties. The group plans on putting out a new album early next year entitled Anything Could Happen. It will be the first Bash and Pop record since their 1993 debut Friday Night Is Killing Me, which will be rereleased on vinyl with the new LP. 


"Since recording my last two solo records in a rather piecemeal way, I found myself longing to make a record in the same way that we made the early Replacements records: live, in the studio, as a band," the bassist said in a statement. "Since early 2015 I've been recording new songs with new and old friends, cutting all of them as live as possible without losing too much fidelity nor over-thinking the songs."

Stinson worked with a number of musicians on the forthcoming Bash and Pop record, including Steve Selvidge (The Hold Steady), Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi All-Stars) and Frank Ferrer (Guns N' Roses), as well as musicians who have played with Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Jack White, Ryan Adams and Screeching Weasel, among others. Record label Fat Possum will be putting out the new LP.

The bassist has also launched a Pledge Music campaign, where people can preorder both the reissue and the new album. He's offering plaid suits, bass guitars, a basement Bash and Pop concert and even his services as a wedding officiant as incentives to give money. They've also announced that the group's first reunion concert will take place at Minneapolis' 7th Street Entry.

A portion of the money Stinson makes from the campaign will be donated to Timkatec trade schools in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. "As you may know, there is still a dire need for us to help these great young people learn how to rebuild their fractured nation," said Stinson. "They desperately need any help that any of us can give, no matter the monetary amount. I chose this school after visiting their graduation in 2011 and seeing for myself what a big part of the long-term solution it is for the people and infrastructure of Haiti."

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