Samsung is facing a lawsuit, and no, it’s not over the Galaxy Note 7

Lulu Chang
Samsung is facing a lawsuit, and no, it’s not over the Galaxy Note 7
In the latest piece of bad news to hit the South Korean phone maker, Samsung is finding itself in hot waters again. This one involves a Galaxy S7 Edge -- not the recalled Galaxy Note 7.

Samsung is on its way to court, and it’s not even over the Galaxy Note 7.

In the latest piece of bad news to hit the South Korean phone maker, Samsung is finding itself in hot (or rather, explosive) waters again. The incident in question involves a Galaxy S7 Edge that caught fire in its owner’s pocket and left him with second- and third-degree burns. The incident occurred on May 30, before the release and subsequent recall of Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7.

According to reports, the smartphone owner, Daniel Ramirez, was at work on a construction site in Ohio when his S7 Edge began to go haywire. The smartphone began “whistling, screeching, and vibrating” from its place in Ramirez’s right front pocket, and then began emitting smoke. As he tried to take the phone out of his pocket, he burned his right hand.

The S7 then reportedly “exploded without any warning,” resulting in severe burns. “He suffered severe and permanent burn injuries to his groin, legs, and lower back that required a significant skin graft surgery and will necessitate extensive physical therapy moving forward,” reports state.

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It is not yet known whether or not the batteries in the Galaxy S7 Edge were supplied by Samsung SDI, the company responsible for the defective Galaxy Note 7 power source (the company has since been replaced by Chinese manufacturer ATL, which will supply the next batch of Note 7 batteries). Regardless, it’s Samsung that’s being forced to answer to the tragic malfunction. The company currently faces a product liability lawsuit related to the incident involving the Galaxy S7.

Samsung also finds itself dealing with the Note 7 debacle. In the latest incident, a six-year-old boy was injured over the weekend when one of the devices exploded in New York. It’s one of several dozen incidents involving the Note 7 that have been reported since the phone’s release in August.

D.J. Koh, Samsung’s president of mobile communications, issued a statement urging customers to participate in the recall. “Our number one priority is the safety of our customers. We are asking users to power down their Galaxy Note 7s and exchange them as soon as possible,” he said. “We are expediting replacement devices so that they can be provided through the exchange program as conveniently, as possible and in compliance with related regulations. We sincerely thank our customers for their understanding and patience.”