Panasonic confirms stabilization issue with G85 mirrorless camera, says fix is coming

Hillary Grigonis
Digital Trends

Yesterday, Panasonic confirmed an image stabilization issue on the G85, saying that a firmware fix is being worked on for the one of the biggest features on the company’s latest mirrorless camera.

Panasonic confirmed the issue in an Instagram post, saying that the G85 didn’t deliver the same performance as the older GX85 while panning in video mode. After confirming reports of the glitch, Panasonic said that it is already working on a software solution, even though the company became aware of the issue less than a week ago.

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“Less than a week ago, Panasonic became aware of some reports that the G85’s image stabilization wasn’t delivering the same level of smooth performance that the GX85 is while slow panning in video mode,” the statement reads. “Panasonic is working to solve the issue with a firmware update as soon as we can. Panasonic appreciates all the valuable feedback and always focuses on meeting or exceeding our customers’ expectations.”

According to early users, when panning the camera, the footage appears to stutter — one YouTube user, Marcin Rucinski, said the footage was actually smoother with the stabilization system turned off. Rucinski said that many users likely wouldn’t notice the issue, but having shot with the earlier G80, he knew something was off when the footage was less stable than the previous model.

While some G85 users confirmed they also noticed the issue, other users have posted responses saying they did not experience the same issues while panning.

The G85’s image stabilization system is one of the micro four thirds camera’s largest selling points, and is based on its new gyro-based sensor. Paired with a stabilized lens, the camera is capable of stabilizing footage at up to five stops. The mirrorless camera also includes 4K video at 30fps and a Depth From DeFocus autofocus system that allows for in-camera focus stacking.