New This Week: The Weeknd, Garth Brooks, and More

Wendy Geller
Senior Editor
Yahoo Music

 

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Searching for something to listen to this holiday weekend? Yahoo Music has you covered with a rundown of some of this week’s biggest/buzzing releases, including new music from the Weeknd and Garth Brooks to cap off Thanksgiving. Check back every Friday for a fresh list of albums to help fuel your weekend playlists.

The Weeknd: Starboy (Republic). Abel Tesfaye, aka The Weeknd, is back to follow up his immensely successful Beauty Behind the Madness of last year, this time sporting shorter hair and a long guest list. Daft Punk, Kendrick Lamar, Future, and Lana Del Rey all make appearances on Starboy, which marks Tesfaye’s third studio full length. The album is, by his own admission, heavily influenced by both David Bowie (the title is a nod to 1972’s “Starman”) and Prince—two icons who passed away earlier this year.

Garth Brooks: Gunslinger (Pearl). Brooks ended a 13-year retirement from the studio two years ago with comeback album Man Against Machine. This year finds him in swinging form following up his welcome re-emergence into the recording world. Gunslinger features Brooks’s signature assured, pleasant delivery on a combination of ballads and uptempo party-ready tunes—plus a standout duet with wife Trisha Yearwood.

Rumer: This Girl’s in Love: A Bacharach And David Songbook (East West/Rhino). Platinum-selling British singer-songwriter Rumer’s fourth album features some of Burt Bacharach and Hal David’s most memorable co-compositions. Recorded at the renowned Capitol Studios, the set includes an appearance by Bacharach himself on piano.

Jay Daniel: Broken Knowz (Technicolour). Detroit-based DJ/producer Jay Daniel is a 25-year-old whiz kid around his local scene with his offbeat take on electronica and house music. Broken Knowz is his debut full length—recorded in his mom’s basement and built around his own drumming skills, the album is seeped in a natural, grooving vibe that sets it apart from more clinical-feeling offerings common in the genre.