Microsoft to reportedly end sales of Lumia by end of year

Imad Khan
Microsoft to reportedly end sales of Lumia by end of year
According to a source within Microsoft to WinBeta, Microsoft will be ending the Lumia brand later this year. This could mean that Microsoft would be re-entering the mobile space with a different phone.

The end is nigh for Lumia, as new reports suggest that Microsoft might killing off the brand.

According to WinBeta, an anonymous source within Microsoft claims that the company will be ending sales of all Lumia handsets by the end of the year.

Related: Better late than never: Microsoft rolls out Windows 10 Mobile Anniversary Update

There aren’t too many Lumia devices left on the market as Microsoft has slowed the release of handsets. It makes sense, as the handset has been dipping each quarter in market share, making it a less valuable proposition for developers. Microsoft has also been liquidating Lumia devices with buy-one get-one offers and other discounts.

This doesn’t mean that Windows 10 for Mobile is dead. Microsoft has two major updates scheduled in 2017 and has been encouraging third-party manufacturers to continue making supporting devices.

Rumors continue to float around regarding the possibility of a Surface branded phone. Although it’s looking like that project was either pushed to the end of 2017 or has been killed off. Laura Butler, Microsoft’s Director of Engineering at Windows Fundamentals, has been hinting on Twitter that something might be in the works, however.

Lumia, Microsoft’s mobile phone brand, was first introduced in 2011 and set itself apart by having a clean and simple UI that relayed information without having to open apps. Over the years, it grew little by little under Nokia, and picked up bits of market share. But after Microsoft purchased Nokia’s phone division, and after new CEO Satya Nadella fired most of the employees, the brand appears to have fizzled out.

With the introduction of the Lumia 950 and 950XL last year, Microsoft tried to breath new life into the platform by rebranding Windows Phone as Windows 10 for Mobile. The operating system was essentially rebuilt from the ground up, and runs a lighter version of Windows 10. With it came the Universal Windows Platform, making it so that developers could scale apps on mobile, desktop, tablet, and Xbox One. Continuum was also introduced, allowing users to plug in their Windows handset into a monitor and run a lighter desktop version of Windows 10.

Unfortunately, a buggy launch, slow updates, poor app support, and the lack of interesting devices has stopped Windows 10 for Mobile from catching any footing. Long time Windows Phone fans are now putting all their hopes on a Surface Phone, whenever, or if ever, that happens.

Ultimately, only Microsoft can revive its mobile division, and if it plans to do so, it will require the full weight and support of the company.