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Former Sex Pistol John Lydon Refuses to Dance on Thatcher’s Grave

Stop The Presses!

Former Sex Pistol John Lydon Refuses to Dance on Thatcher’s Grave

(Getty Images)

Sex Pistols former frontman John Lydon (a.k.a. Johnny Rotten) seems to have matured a bit since the halcyon days of punk when he derisively sneered anarchic lyrics including, "God save the Queen/She ain’t no human being" ("God Save the Queen"). While he also struck out against former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who died of a stroke on Monday at the age of 87, he is disgusted by the groups around the UK celebrating the Iron Lady’s death.

"I'm not happy about the boo boo parties,” Lydon told the Daily Mail. "... Her politics were really dreadful and derisive and caused a great many issues for me when I was young, for all of us trying to go through that. But that don't mean (sic) I am gonna dance on her grave, as they say. I'm not that kind of person."

Lydon admits he was a virulent Thatcher adversary during her reign from 1975 to 1990, but he said his anger at her ended Monday. "I was her enemy in her life but I will not be her enemy in her death,” he said. "I am not a coward... My entire life, socially, was all around the Maggie era. That was the great challenge as a Sex Pistol was how to deal with Margaret Thatcher. I think we did rather good."

Thatcher’s will be buried on April 17. Lydon will not be in attendance, nor will he watch the event on television.

On a related note, a Facebook group started Monday called "Make Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead Number One on the Week Thatcher Dies," is gaining steam. The Media Guardian reports that the song from The Wizard of Oz has sold over 10,000 copies this week. The song, credited to Judy Garland, was in the top 10 of the British national charts mid-week and the BBC is currently deciding whether to play the song on the air. In a statement to the Daily Mail, the BBC said, "The Official Chart Show on Sunday is a historical and factual account of what the British public has been buying and we will make a decision about playing it when the final chart positions are clear."