Presenter errs with Juan Gabriel's first Latin Grammy Award

Associated Press
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FILE - In this April 20, 2016 photo, the members of the Spanish band Dvicio, from left, Martin Ceballos, Luis Gonzalvo, Andres Ceballos, Nacho Gotor and Alberto Missis pose for a portrait during a press conference promoting the launch of their album "Justo ahora" in Mexico City. Dvicio announced the Latin Grammy for the late Mexican musical star Juan Gabriel, for the best traditional vocal pop album category for "Los duo 2." (AP Photo/Berenice Bautista, File)

FILE - In this April 20, 2016 photo, the members of the Spanish band Dvicio, from left, Martin Ceballos, Luis Gonzalvo, Andres Ceballos, Nacho Gotor and Alberto Missis pose for a portrait during a press conference promoting the launch of their album "Justo ahora" in Mexico City. Dvicio announced the Latin Grammy for the late Mexican musical star Juan Gabriel, for the best traditional vocal pop album category for "Los duo 2." (AP Photo/Berenice Bautista, File)

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Mexican singer-songwriter Juan Gabriel won the first Latin Grammy Award of his long career Thursday, but presenter Andres Ceballos of the group Dvicio apparently didn't realize it was a posthumous prize.

"He's not here," Ceballos said. "The academy will make sure he receives this award."

Gabriel died in August at age 66.

The Spanish pop quintet Dvicio was tapped with announcing winners in various categories Thursday during the untelevised portion of the ceremony. Among them was traditional pop vocal album, which Gabriel won for "Los Duo 2."

Ceballos looked confused when the winning musician didn't appear but continued without correcting himself, presenting the next award to J Balvin for best urban music album.

Twitter users criticized the misstep.

"Shameful," one wrote. "How do you not study before speaking? Juan Gabriel is a legend and he has passed away."

Gabriel also won the night's top prize, album of the year. The presenters said the award will be delivered to Gabriel's family and asked the audience to applaud for the master composer.