Paul McCartney to Play Intimate Gig at Former Biker Bar Outside Joshua Tree

The Hollywood Reporter

Paul McCartney isn't taking the week off between his first Desert Trip gig on Oct. 8 and his upcoming second show on Saturday. The ex-Beatle announced on his website he'll play a rare small club show Thursday night at Pappy & Harriet's Pioneertown Palace in Pioneertown, located near Joshua Tree in Yucca Valley in Southern California. The club's online calendar does not list any performers for the night.

The show will begin at approximately 8:30 p.m. local time. A recording on the club answering machine said tickets will go on sale starting at 6:30 p.m. and will be available only at Pappy & Harriet's box office. It said no one will be allowed to line up before 3 p.m. Price for tickets will be $50 each (including fees and taxes), cash only with no advance sales, and buyers will be limited to only one ticket per person. The capacity at Pappy & Harriet's is 300 and can expand to 700 if utilizing the club's outdoor stage.

A vegetarian buffet, befitting McCartney, who is a vegetarian, will be served, but there would be no dinner reservations and no one would be allowed to leave once inside. The club also asked callers to please leave the area once capacity of the club was reached to respect nearby residents (worth noting: The population of Pioneertown is all of 511).

Pioneertown was named for the Sons of the Pioneers, which, at one time, included Roy Rogers and Gene Autry, each of whom spent time in the area, which was the site of the filming of many classic movies and TV shows. Remnants of film sets, located within spitting distance of Pappy & Harriet's, regularly draw tourists to the area.

The site of the club, at one time a stage used to make Western films into the 1950s, was formerly an outlaw biker bar called The Cantina when it opened in 1972, according to its history. Pappy & Harriet's itself has been open since 1982 and has featured shows by Robert Plant, Vampire Weekend, Leon Russell and Sean Lennon. Joshua Tree - the town and the national park - has long been a destination for musicians, attracting the likes of country rocker Gram Parsons, who died there in 1973, and U2, who named their 1987 album The Joshua Tree following a now-iconic photo shoot in the high desert.

This story originally appeared on Billboard.com.

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