Yolanda Flowers Makes History As Alabama's First Black Woman Governor Nominee I

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Photo:  Courtesy of Flowers’ Website
Photo: Courtesy of Flowers’ Website

Yolanda Flowers is officially Alabama’s Democratic candidate for governor, winning over Sen. Malika Sanders-Fortier. On Tuesday, Flowers won 55% of votes. This apparently makes her the first Black female nominee for governor from a major party in Alabama.

In an interview with AL.com, she expressed her gratitude:

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“I thank God for everything he’s done for us tonight, but the race isn’t over. We still must continue on to encourage our citizens how important it is to vote for the betterment of our state. Thank you so very much, God bless and let’s press toward November 8th as we reconstruct Alabama, together.”

Flowers will face Republican incumbent Governor Kay Ivey during the state’s general election on November 8. Ivey is the first Republican woman and second woman to be elected governor. In 2019, Ivey apologized but refused to step down for wearing blackface during a 1967 college skit at a Baptists Student Union party:

“I offer my heartfelt apologies for the pain and embarrassment this causes, and I will do all I can — going forward — to help show the nation that the Alabama of today is a far cry from the Alabama of the 1960s. We have come a long way, for sure, but we still have a long way to go.”

As governor, Flowers’ plan is to focus on “reconstruction” for Alabama. Her first order of business would be increasing the age for gun purchases in Alabama from 18 to 21. “Don’t you know that we can have gun laws that allow folks to keep their guns and keep Alabamians safe?” Flowers said in a criminal justice town hall meeting.

She also wants to improve behavioral and mental health screenings for children in schools as well as increase the state’s minimum wage to at least $15 an hour. In addition, Flowers has vocalized implementing a parole and prison accountability team for the state.