Why There Was No Singing at Princess Beatrice and Edo Mapelli Mozzi's Wedding Ceremony

Roxanne Adamiyatt
Photo credit: Benjamin Wheeler
Photo credit: Benjamin Wheeler

From Town & Country

Princess Beatrice and her longtime beau Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi got married in a secret ceremony in Windsor on Friday, July 17, attended by only close family members and friends, including the Queen and Prince Philip. The hush-hush nuptials took place in lieu of the more public ceremony that the couple had planned for May 29, which was canceled due to the ongoing global Covid-19 crisis. And now the pictures of the ceremony have been released by Buckingham Palace along with details about the tight-knit ceremony—including why there were no songs sung during the service.

The intimate service, which took place at The Royal Chapel of All Saints at Royal Lodge, Windsor, was officiated by The Reverend Canon Paul Wright, Sub-Dean of the Chapel Royal and the Reverend Canon Martin Poll, Domestic Chaplain to Her Majesty the Queen. The service was held in accordance to government guidelines, so no hymns were sung, but there was a selection of music played, including the National Anthem (which was played and not sung as well).

Photo credit: Benjamin Wheeler
Photo credit: Benjamin Wheeler

Also included in the ceremony was a reading of two of the couple's favorite poems, which were read by their mothers; Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare and "I Carry You in My Heart" by E.E. Cummings. A reading of St. Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 13, verses 1-13, was also made, along with prayers.

According to the Palace, the Bride was walked down the aisle by her father, and Mapelli Mozzi's son was best man and pageboy.

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