Why This Doctor Doesn't Recommend Using a Melatonin Diffuser

Hedy Phillips
·2 mins read
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With the rise of vaping, it's no surprise that vape pens and diffusers for melatonin now exist. Aimed at people who struggle with sleeping, melatonin diffusers are designed to give the user a hit of melatonin to help regulate their sleep cycles and put them to sleep. However, the jury is still out on melatonin diffusers. We spoke with neurologist Dr. Alcibiades Rodriguez, assistant professor in the department of neurology at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine, who specializes in sleep medicine, to get his take on melatonin and using a diffuser.

While Dr. Rodriguez advocates for using the proper amount of melatonin to help get your circadian rhythm on track - not for insomnia - he's hesitant to make a judgment call on melatonin diffusers. "It is too early to tell yet," he told POPSUGAR of these fairly new devices. "I think I would like to see some safety data." He noted that taking a regulated amount of melatonin daily is fine to help get your sleep-wake cycle intact and pointed out that melatonin is a substance that's naturally produced by your body, so a supplement is generally OK as long as it's pure melatonin in the right amount.

If you're struggling with insomnia or having an adverse reaction to melatonin, it's time to check with your doctor. We also recommend checking with your doctor before giving a melatonin diffuser a go to see what they say for you. Melatonin diffusers may not provide the right amount of melatonin that your body needs and can bring up health concerns related to inhalation, and that's a discussion to have directly with your provider.

Dr. Rodriguez instead recommended trying a remedy like tea in place of relying on melatonin or the diffusers. He said that circadian rhythms can be especially off due to anxiety, and that you should look for a way to relieve the anxiety and, in turn, sleep better. "Chamomile tea or valerian root may work to ease the anxiety and then help sleep," he suggested. You could also try one of these other teas to help you sleep.

Related: We Asked a Neurologist Exactly How Much Melatonin You Can Take Before Bed