Why You Should Always Be Careful When Serving Your Dog Potatoes

Courtney Campbell
Photo credit: John Howard
Photo credit: John Howard

From Country Living

Whether you're eating them baked, roasted, or scalloped, potatoes are one staple food you and your pet can enjoy together.

Potatoes are safe food for canines to eat, according to Dr. Danielle Bernal, a veterinarian with Wellness Natural Pet Food. In fact, this healthy vegetable is packed with several essential vitamins and minerals that are good for pups.

"They've got high digestibility and they're good for energy," Dr. Bernal tells CountryLiving.com. This starchy veggie is a great topping for kibble, and it can also be served alongside some of your dog's other favorite foods. Leave the skin on and you'll be adding even more minerals and fiber to his meal. But before you give potatoes to your furry friend, you should make sure it is fully cooked. This will ensure your pet can easily chew and digest it.

The next time you have potato scraps on your plate, feel free to scrape leftovers into your pup's bowl after dinner. Here are some additional tips to make sure you're providing your dog with a well-rounded diet:

  • Dogs need to eat a balanced diet, which includes a hearty meat base with healthy fats. Fruits and veggies should only make up 10-20 percent of a dog's diet.

  • Improve the health of your dog's skin, coat, and muscle strength by serving him foods rich in protein.

  • Add even more fiber, minerals, and moisture to your pup's meal by topping it with fruits and veggies like broccoli and apples.

Curious what else your furry friend can enjoy? Country Living animal expert and veterinarian Dr. Tricia Earley shared her tips with us: Well-cooked turkey (minus the gravy!) is a huge hit around the holidays, and sweet potatoes and pumpkin (not pie, which is too high in sugar) are both dog-approved. You want to avoid mashed potatoes, Dr. Earley explains, due to the high butter content, which won't sit well on your dog's stomach.

Other dog-safe foods per Dr. Earley are green beans and cranberries (again, avoid the butter). Also avoid raisins and chocolate. And Dr. Earley advises that if your pet does happen to ingest something you wish they hadn't, it's best to call your vet right away.

Photo credit: American Artist
Photo credit: American Artist

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