This New Water Purifier Removes Pollutants and Microplastics—and Looks Good Doing It

·3 min read

A new company hopes it can be part of the solution to eliminating plastic-bottle waste for good.

Dubai-based water technology brand Wisewell, co-founded by energy entrepreneurs Sami Khoreibi and Sebastien Wakim, has developed a clean-water solution driven by sustainability, function, and design. The first prototype was developed in January 2021 and after three further iterations, the Wisewell Model 1 is now available for $699. It doesn’t require installation; you just plug it in and fill it up with tap water.

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The sleek design fits into any room. - Credit: Wisewell
The sleek design fits into any room. - Credit: Wisewell

Wisewell

“Current tap-water filtration systems are either inconvenient or ineffective,” Wakim tells Robb Report. “For example, pitcher filters don’t work against all contaminants. Full-house systems or under-the-sink reverse osmosis are also an eye sore, meant to be hidden and need to be installed by a professional technician. Most of the time, these systems don’t provide transparency about the effectiveness and remaining lifetime of the filters.”

The filter comes in black and white. - Credit: Wisewell
The filter comes in black and white. - Credit: Wisewell

Wisewell

Wisewell claims to remove more pollutants and even tiny microplastics than the average reverse osmosis filter, using its four-stage Full Spectrum Filtration technology. The carbon filter gets rid of mercury, chlorine and volatile organic compounds from water; the reverse-osmosis filter uses high-pressure filtration that removes long-lasting, hard-to-filter compounds, such as metals and chemicals; the Maifan stone mineral filter then adds back in trace amounts of minerals to enhance flavor, texture, and health benefits; and last, the UV lamp eliminates microorganisms and bacteria. 

The new tech is also “more efficient than the average reverse-osmosis system,” Khoreibi says. “While most traditional reverse osmosis produces four gallons of wastewater for every one gallon of usable water, Wisewell flips that ratio on its head. It recycles part of the wastewater so that, on average, for every three to four gallons of fresh water produced, only one gallon of waste water is discarded.”

The product uses a unique four-stage water filtration technology. - Credit: Wisewell
The product uses a unique four-stage water filtration technology. - Credit: Wisewell

Wisewell

As you’d expect in 2022, there’s an app that syncs with the system to give you insights into water quality, environmental impact, and how much money you’re saving compared to bottled water. It then automatically orders replacement filters and sends a notification when it’s time to switch them out. According to the website, using the product for one year can reduce your water carbon footprint by 70%.

“The inspiration came from the realization that the way we drink water is broken,” Khoreibi says. “The fact that we take fresh water from a remote location, place it in a plastic container and ship it across the world makes no sense. Bottled water is expensive and completely unsustainable. About 35 billion empty water bottles are discarded in the U.S. each year alone.”

It is installation-free, giving you more time to hang up your pictures. - Credit: Wisewell
It is installation-free, giving you more time to hang up your pictures. - Credit: Wisewell

Wisewell

Unlike many functional household products, design wasn’t an afterthought. The co-founders enlisted Emmy-award-winning Toronto-based design studio Shape Products to help them create the sleek look for their debut product. 

“Water coolers and purifiers were often hidden away in pantries and kitchens based on their poor designs,” Wakim says. “From a design standpoint, Wisewell has always been inspired by companies like Dyson, Apple and Tesla, where form meets function at the highest level.”

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