Tim Robinson tells Seth Meyers about his SNL sketch that could've ruined New York's bug ecosystem

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Meyers and Robinson laugh at the  destruction of New York City’s  bug societies.
Meyers and Robinson laugh at the destruction of New York City’s bug societies.

Tim Robinson has been rightly celebrated for the second season of his Netflix sketch show, I Think You Should Leave, which continues to bring the world happiness in the form of existentially anguished prank show hosts and burger-hungry professors. As he shared with Seth Meyers on a recent episode of Late Night, though, Robinson is also a dangerous man who’s prior work on Saturday Night Live once came all too close to destroying New York City’s bug ecosystem.

During the interview, Meyers refers to all the challenges comedy writers like Robinson create for stunt people and props departments by coming up with ideas like “corpses flopping out of coffins.” He goes on to mention an old SNL sketch Robinson and I Think You Should Leave’s Zach Kanin wrote where an investigative reporter (and his little brother) look into why bugs are always running everywhere—a pretty simple bit that involved hiring insect handlers in order to get shots of reporters sticking microphones in their path.

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“There was one bug there that the bug handler was like, ‘Don’t let that one get away. If that one gets away it could mess up the entire New York City ecosystem,” Robinson remembers.

Meyers asks how good an actor the bug could have been to be worth the risk, and Robinson recalls the terror of potentially being the guy responsible for permanently altering a major city’s ecological balance because of a funny idea he wrote down for TV. The interview continues by touching on casting I Think You Should Leave’s “Santa Claus,” skateboarding, and the ongoing memeification of his work, but the main point remains the profound, previously unknown dangers of sketch comedy—something far more terrifying than even a grim post apocalyptic future filled with never-ending skeleton wars.

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