After Texas shooting, NAACP Tells Congress: ‘Don’t Just Post A Tweet, Pass A Bill’

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 Derrick Johnson, President, and CEO of the NAACP, attended the PGA Works Beyond The Green at Union League on April 30, 2022, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Derrick Johnson, President, and CEO of the NAACP, attended the PGA Works Beyond The Green at Union League on April 30, 2022, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Like many Americans around the country who are angry and saddened about the shooting that killed 19 children and two adults, including a teacher in Texas yesterday, the NAACP is calling on Congress to do something about gun control. Derrick Johnson, the president of the NAACP, released a statement on Tuesday telling Congress to “Don’t just post a tweet, pass a bill,” The Hill reports.

From The Hill:

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“There’s no statement. There are no words. I’m shattered for the community and frustrated by the lack of action by the government that should be working for the people,” NAACP President Derrick Johnson said in a statement on Tuesday.

There were those senators who rushed to their social media pages to offer the standard “thoughts and prayers” response, but the truth is, there has been no gun control legislation passed since the Sandy Hook tragedy.

H.R. 8, or the Bipartisan Background Checks Act that passed the House in March 2021, would close loopholes in gun purchases, requiring a background check for all gun sales. Republican senators have refused to vote on it. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) stated, “H.R. 8 is too far-reaching” and wants a narrow bill that “exempts transfers and sales between family and friends.

Everytown For Gun Safety notes background checks have effectively blocked 4 million sales “to people prohibited by law from having guns.” Senate Minority leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y) has said today there is “no gun bill imminent” and “Americans can cast their vote in November” based on how people stand on guns. To get any legislation through, the Senate would need 60 votes (Republicans aren’t going to do that) or abolish the filibuster (Sen. Manchin and Sinema won’t do that).

Johnson expressed his frustration and implored lawmakers to act immediately.

“Every time it’s just more thoughts and prayers – the only thing this Congress seems to be able to do successfully. Congress, do your job,” Johnson concluded. “Don’t just post a tweet, pass a bill. Kids are dying.”