New telemedicine service The Cusp rolls out at-home hormone test for women to predict menopause

Close-up of woman using mobile telephone
Close-up of woman using mobile telephone
Jonathan Shieber

The Cusp, a newly launched startup offering telemedicine services for women in perimenopause and menopause, is launching an at-home hormone test service that slashes the cost of in-office visits and lab tests.

Women in California can order the test at a cost of $159 for a telemedical consultation and test, versus roughly $500 for having the same test and lab work administered in a clinic, according to the company.

Unlike other, commonly prescribed hormone tests, The Cusp bases its test relies on new research that a key hormone measurement can help predict the time to menopause. The company is currently working with researchers to help the broader medical community validate these findings and believes the combination of consultation and improved access to diagnostics will greatly enhance the ability to more accurately predict onset. 

“Menopause is very stigmatized and midlife care is a highly underserved market. We launched The Cusp to provide women with a new model of care during this stage of life so women can optimize their health," said The Cusp, chief executive, Taylor Sittler. "Our focus begins with perimenopause treatment, as early care can lead to healthier outcomes."

The company said that the test is best for women experiencing early signs of perimenopause, typically between the ages of 42 and 50.

“Throughout my career I’ve been focused on the intersection of women’s health, menopause and breast cancer. It was shocking to me how little information is out there for women, so I worked with national committees helping establish guidelines for managing menopause symptoms and sexual functioning in cancer survivors," said Dr. Mindy Goldman, director of the Gynecology Center for Cancer Survivors and At-Risk Women Program at UCSF, and a physician working with The Cusp . "I’m thrilled to be a part of  The Cusp, as we are on the front lines providing women with comprehensive diagnostic tools and personalized care so that menopause can be faced head-on and managed with a multi-pronged approach that can include medical interventions, naturopathic solutions and/or hormone replacement therapies.”

The company is providing care to roughly 200 patients, and is growing its membership rapidly. With its recent launch, The Cusp has joined startups like CurieMD, Elektra Health and Geneve, which are all focused on providing medical services to women in perimenopause and menopause.

To date, the company has raised $4 million from investors, including HomeBrew, Village Global and individual investors like Katie Stanton and Megan Pai.

Sittler, a co-founder of Color Genomics, sees an opportunity in applying new diagnostics tests and technology to treating women as they enter menopause.

The Cusp charges an initial $210 for its expert care package. That includes the test and three months of care including virtual care visits with clinicians, unlimited chats, personalized treatment plans and discounts on supplements. Should patients want to continue using the company's services they pay an additional monthly fee of $72 per month.

More From

  • WhatsApp pilots new feature to fight misinformation: Search the web

    WhatsApp, one of the most popular instant messaging platforms on the planet, has rolled out a new feature in select markets that makes it easier for users to verify whether the assertions made in messages they have received on the app are true. The Facebook -owned service has enabled users in Brazil, Italy, Ireland, Mexico, Spain, UK, and US to click on a magnifying glass-shaped icon next to frequently forwarded messages -- those that have been forwarded at least five times -- to search the web for their contents and verify them. WhatsApp said the new feature, called ‘search the web’, works by allowing users to upload the message -- it could be text or an image -- via their browser.

  • Twitter warns investors of possible fine from FTC consent order probe

    Twitter has disclosed it's facing a potential fine of more than a hundred million dollars as a result of a probe by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) which believes the company violated a 2011 consent order by using data provided by users for a security purpose to target them with ads. In an SEC filing, reported on earlier by the New York Times, Twitter revealed it received the draft complaint from the FTC late last month. Twitter found that when advertisers uploaded their own marketing lists (of emails and/or phone numbers) it matched users to data they had submitted purely to set up two-factor authentication on their Twitter account.

  • Grab launches new consumer financial services, including micro-investments and loans

    Grab announced today that its financial unit, which previously focused mainly on services for entrepreneurs and small businesses, is launching a slew of consumer products, including micro-investments, loans, health insurance and a pay-later program. Based in Singapore, Grab began in 2012 as a ride-hailing company before expanding into on-demand deliveries and other services. Since then, its financial services portfolio has grown through a series of partnerships and the acquisition of Bento, which allowed it to offer investment and wealth management services as well.

  • Daily Crunch: Microsoft-TikTok acquisition inches closer to reality

    A possible Microsoft -TikTok acquisition is causing plenty of drama, we review Google's new budget Pixel and SpaceX's Crew Dragon returns to Earth. This weekend, Microsoft confirmed reports that it's in talks to acquire TikTok, the popular mobile video app currently owned by Chinese company ByteDance.